Disclosing Intertextualities: The Stories, Plays, and Novels of Susan Glaspell

By Martha C. Carpentier; Barbara Ozieblo | Go to book overview

AMERICA UNMASKED: CULTURAL COMMENTARY
IN SUSAN GLASPELL'S SHORT FICTION

Colette Lindroth

While Susan Glaspell's plays have emerged from their former obscurity to being reconsidered as classics of the early twentiethcentury American theater and her novels are beginning to be critically reevaluated, her short stories for the most part continue to receive little or largely unenthusiastic attention. Aside from some compelling interpretations by Barbara Ozieblo in Susan Glaspell: A Critical Biography and my own essay in Susan Glaspell: Essays on Her Theater and Fiction, commentary on Glaspell's short fiction remains scarce.1 Arthur E. Water man's 1966 volume on Glaspell for the Twayne series was the only major study to appear between the popular reception of Glaspell's stories during her own lifetime and the feminist rereadings of her work today, and its condescending dismissal of Glaspell's short fiction has unfortunately been influential.2 Only ten pages are devoted to her entire output of short fiction, estimated at over forty stories. Both her stories and their supposed readers are belittled, as Waterman finds her short fiction "written for the feminine audience" which, according to him, demands sentimental plots and idealized romances. He gives faint praise to her twenty-six "Freeport" stories, crediting only her ability to control "triteness and implicit sentimentality" through "careful structure" and to avoid "the extreme use of dialect, the incredible

1 Barbara Ozieblo, Susan Glaspell: A Critical Biography, Chapel Hill: The
University of North Carolina Press, 2000; Colette Lindroth, "Lifting the Masks of
Male-Female Discourse: The Rhetorical Strategies of Susan Glaspell," in Susan
Glaspell: Essays on Her Theater and Fiction
, ed. Linda Ben-Zvi, Ann Arbor: The
University of Michigan Press, 1995, 303–16.

2 For an analysis of the causes and effects of Waterman's derogation of Glaspell's
fiction, see Martha C. Carpentier, The Major Novels of Susan Glaspell, Gainesville:
University Press of Florida, 2001, 3–7.

-257-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Disclosing Intertextualities: The Stories, Plays, and Novels of Susan Glaspell
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 307

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.