After Lewis and Clark: Mountain Men and the Paths to the Pacific

By Robert M. Utley | Go to book overview

SOURCES

Most of the mountain men were illiterate, or at least not literate enough to leave a written record of their lives. A handful of exceptions, most of them published, provide the best contemporary view of trapper life. They are included in the following bibliography. Prominent and obscure alike claim biographies of widely varying merit. The single most valuable source for these men is the monumental compilation edited by LeRoy R. Hafen, Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West, 10 vols. (Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Co., 1965–72).

The Missouri Historical Society in St. Louis provides the richest single depository of manuscript sources of the fur trade on the Missouri River and in the Rocky Mountains. I have accessed the Chouteau Collection by microfilm, in the excellent edition compiled and edited by William R. Swagerty. This is titled "Papers of the St. Louis Fur Trade," issued by University Publications of America, Bethesda, Maryland. Part 1 is the Chouteau Collection, 1752–1925. Part 2 is Fur Company Ledgers and Account Books, 1802–1871. For my purposes, Part 1 has been the most useful. The Missouri Historical Society is also the home of the Sublette and Campbell Collections, which are not included in the microfilm publication of the Papers of the St. Louis Fur Trade.

This brings me to Dale L. Morgan, that exceptional and indefatigable scholar of the fur trade and many other western topics. Morgan's papers at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, contain transcripts of documents from the Sublette and Campbell Collections. Because they are on microfilm, I have used his transcriptions rather than the originals.

An indispensable source for fur-trade history is newspapers, especially the St. Louis newspapers. Again Dale Morgan has done much of my research for me. He made transcripts of nearly every item bearing on the history of the West in the newspapers of twenty-four states. Where my notes credit no other source for a newspaper citation, a Morgan transcript is the source. Copies of many of these transcripts (but not all) are in the Dale Morgan Collection at the Utah State Historical Society in Salt Lake City.

-297-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
After Lewis and Clark: Mountain Men and the Paths to the Pacific
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.