Understanding Child Sexual Abuse

By Edward L. Rowan | Go to book overview

2.
Who Is at Risk?

In child sexual abuse, the more powerful adult takes advantage of the weakness he sees in the child. Being an altar server for an abusive priest, attending a day care center run by an abusive operator, playing for a pedophile Little League coach, or hugging a too-friendly uncle are all activities that put children at a higher risk of abuse; however, not all children in such circumstances become victims. A strong sense of right and wrong, self-confidence, and a willingness to resist and then to report inappropriate behavior all protect against abuse. These same characteristics may also lessen the traumatic response if abuse does occur. Children who lack these attributes are at risk.

No child asks to be sexually abused. Many are. Determining the exact incidence of child sexual abuse is difficult, but surveys have generally found that 10 to 15 percent of American men and 15 to 25 percent of American women were exposed to at least one unwanted sexual experience as children. There appears to be no difference in incidence based on ethnic background. Rates of abuse among African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans are the same as those for non-Hispanic white Americans, although individuals, families, and cultural groups may process the experience differently. These differences would be a fruitful area for research.

In 1974 the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act made reporting mandatory in all states. The requirement to report suspected abuse applies to health-care workers, school personnel, childcare providers, social workers, law enforcement officers, and mental health professionals; some states include film processors, emergency medical technicians, and firefighters.

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Child Sexual Abuse
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • 1: Who Becomes an Abuser? 3
  • 2: Who is at Risk? 19
  • 3: What Are the Effects of Abuse? 29
  • 4: Treating the Survivor 43
  • 5: Treating the Abuser 57
  • 6: Prevention 67
  • 7: The Search for Answers 77
  • Appendix A - State Sex Offender Registry Sites 85
  • Appendix B - Publications 90
  • Appendix C - The Internet 92
  • Index 101
  • Understanding Health and Sickness Series 103
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 104

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.