Understanding Child Sexual Abuse

By Edward L. Rowan | Go to book overview

4.
Treating the Survivor

If the worst effects of child sexual abuse are best described in terms of post-traumatic stress disorder, the best treatment approaches should follow that same paradigm. For those traumatized individuals who continue to show symptoms months or years after being abused, formal psychotherapy may offer the best chance for a better life. In general terms, the survivor (no longer a victim) must recognize the trauma, control responses to it, and integrate it into the life experience.

In her classic 1992 book Trauma and Recovery, Dr. Judith Herman discussed three stages of recovery from any traumatic experience: safety, remembrance and mourning, and reconnection. It is important to remember that the recovery process is not always a straight-line progression; overlap and falling back are common. Recovery cannot begin until the trauma is identified, acknowledged, and, particularly in the case of child sexual abuse, ended. Herman stresses the importance of a supporting and trusting relationship with the therapist as critical for the recovery process to take place. Telling the truth and establishing clear boundaries are integral parts of the therapeutic relationship.

Safety requires that the actual threat of danger is over and that the abuse has ended. For the abused child, this means an end to the relationship with the abuser and social support for the termination of that relationship. For the adult survivor, it means that society assigns responsibility to the abuser and harm to the victim. To restore a sense of order and justice, the perpetrator should be held legally responsible in terms of both punishment and restitution. Unfortunately, the justice system

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Child Sexual Abuse
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • 1: Who Becomes an Abuser? 3
  • 2: Who is at Risk? 19
  • 3: What Are the Effects of Abuse? 29
  • 4: Treating the Survivor 43
  • 5: Treating the Abuser 57
  • 6: Prevention 67
  • 7: The Search for Answers 77
  • Appendix A - State Sex Offender Registry Sites 85
  • Appendix B - Publications 90
  • Appendix C - The Internet 92
  • Index 101
  • Understanding Health and Sickness Series 103
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 104

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.