Understanding Child Sexual Abuse

By Edward L. Rowan | Go to book overview

6.
Prevention

Primary prevention is the ideal result of any intervention in a pathological process. The preventive model of public health was developed with reference to infectious diseases and is most easily applied to them. In primary prevention, a healthy person does not contract the disease. Immunization against smallpox and mosquito control to eliminate yellow fever are examples of primary prevention. In secondary prevention, a person may be asymptomatic but have disease risk factors or preclinical disease. Pap smears for cervical cancer, PSA screening for prostate cancer, and weight control and smoking cessation where there is a strong family history of heart disease are all measures that allow early intervention should an existing disease be discovered, and then allow time for effective treatment. Tertiary preventive measures take place after a person shows signs or symptoms of illness but before secondary problems have occurred. Debriding a wound to prevent gangrene or treating AIDS to prevent a viral or fungal superinfection accomplish this.

The preventive model is more difficult to apply to posttraumatic stress disorders, including those caused by childhood sexual abuse. In an ideal world, trauma would be eliminated. If children were made aware of the danger and internalized such devices as [recognize, resist, and report] or [say 'no' and tell someone] when confronted with a high-risk situation, those measures would prevent the trauma and, by extension, prevent post-traumatic stress disorder. If researchers could study resilient survivors and determine whether they possess teachable skills, then the teaching of those skills could

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Child Sexual Abuse
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • 1: Who Becomes an Abuser? 3
  • 2: Who is at Risk? 19
  • 3: What Are the Effects of Abuse? 29
  • 4: Treating the Survivor 43
  • 5: Treating the Abuser 57
  • 6: Prevention 67
  • 7: The Search for Answers 77
  • Appendix A - State Sex Offender Registry Sites 85
  • Appendix B - Publications 90
  • Appendix C - The Internet 92
  • Index 101
  • Understanding Health and Sickness Series 103
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 104

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.