Conversations on Russia: Reform from Yeltsin to Putin

By Padma Desai | Go to book overview

Participants

Anatoly Chubais, former minister of privatization and first deputy prime minister in the Yeltsin governments; currently CEO of United Energy Systems (UES), Russia's giant electric power company, and one of the leaders of the Union of Right Forces (SPS), Russia's leading reform party

Sergei Dubinin, former chair of the Central Bank of Russia, under whose watch in August 1998 the ruble collapsed; currently deputy CEO of UES

Yegor Gaidar, acting prime minister in 1992; currently director of the Center for Transition Economies, Moscow, and one of the leaders of the SPS

Boris Jordan, founder of the Moscow office of Credit Suisse First Boston and of Renaissance Capital, currently Russia's largest investment bank; former general manager of NTV, one of Russia's leading television networks, from which he was fired by President Putin; currently CEO of the Sputnik Group, an investment-cumfinancial group

Mikhail Kasyanov, prime minister from 2000 to early 2004 during President Vladimir Putin's first presidency; plans to run for president in the 2008 election

Martin Malia (deceased), eminent historian of Russia; professor emeritus of history at the University of California–Berkeley

Jack Matlock Jr ., U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union from 1987 to 1991 under Mikhail Gorbachev; author of Autopsy on an Empire: The American Ambassador's Account of the Collapse of the Soviet Union, and Reagan and Gorbachev: How the Cold War Ended

Boris Nemtsov, former governor of Nizhni Novgorod province and first deputy prime minister in the government under Yeltsin; founder and leader of SPS

Richard Pipes, eminent historian of Russia; professor emeritus of history at Harvard University; national security advisor in the Reagan administration

Sergei Rogov, director of the U.S.-Canada Institute, Moscow, a leading Russian think tank

-xiii-

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