Conversations on Russia: Reform from Yeltsin to Putin

By Padma Desai | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
anatoly chubais
The "Neo-Bolshevik" Privatizer

MAY 1999

We were the only team in the country who could discuss—and not just discuss
but also make—changes…Of course, a number of alternative government think
tanks were around, but all of those were Communist. It was simple: we or the
Communists.

No one thought that we would immediately get economic growth in Russia by
distributing vouchers.

Let us understand that the oligarchs are a big private Russian business with both
positive and negative features they bring to Russia. The fact is that this private
business was the major political resource for preventing Communist leader
Gennady Zyuganov from becoming president in 1996.

I do not believe that Russia will fall apart.

Our strategy is to win. We have to win. I mean we shall win…and…if we
lose, we will just disappear physically. There is no doubt about it.


MAY 1999

DESAI: You are a very committed believer in the market economy. How did your commitment start?

CHUBAIS: My belief in the market economy has a long history. It began long before the market economy started in Russia. I graduated from the St. Petersburg engineering economics school. It was clear to me that the Soviet economy was in terrible shape and was headed toward disaster. It was difficult to find reasonable answers for the situation in the Soviet economy. Articles in textbooks and scientific journals discussed different ideas without clearly understanding them or how an economy worked. I had a clear understanding myself, and I found several people

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conversations on Russia: Reform from Yeltsin to Putin
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 383

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.