Speaking against Number: Heidegger, Language and the Politics of Calculation

By Stuart Elden | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book has its genesis in initial conversations with Michael Dillon and Morris Kaplan, who have continued to offer encouragement and suggestions throughout. Earlier versions of this manuscript have been read by Ben Anderson, Paul Harrison, Laurence Paul Hemming, Adam Holden, Mark Neocleous and Jeremy Valentine, who all offered extremely useful and challenging comments, and at times better grasped what I was striving to show than I had then realised myself. Versions of parts of this book have been given as papers at the University of North Texas, Heythrop College, Royal Geographical Society, University of Durham, University of Warwick, University of Essex, Association of American Geographers, Martin Heidegger Forschungsgruppe in Meßkirch, and the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven. Its ideas have benefited from discussion at these and other places with Charles Bambach, Babette Babich, Robert Bernasconi, Neil Brenner, Keith Wayne Brown, Jeremy Crampton, Franc¸oise Dastur, Miguel de Beistegui, Michael Eldred, Be´atrice Han-Pile, Theodore Kisiel (who also clarified some textual details regarding GA20), the late Richard Owsley, Allen Scult, Nigel Thrift and Maja Zehfuss. Thomas Sheehan most generously made available his draft translation of portions of GA21. Colleagues at the University of Durham, especially those involved in the Social/Spatial Theory research cluster, have been a constant source of inspiration. Elizabeth James provided invaluable assistance with checking the Greek and German; Hamzah Muzaini greatly assisted with the proofs and compiled the index; Susan again showed me what else counted.

Early versions of some of its ideas have appeared in the following places:

'The Place of Geometry: Heidegger's Mathematical Excursus on Aristotle', The Heythrop Journal, Vol. 42 No. 3, July 2001, pp. 311–28.

-vii-

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Speaking against Number: Heidegger, Language and the Politics of Calculation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • One – Speaking: Rhetorical Politics 17
  • Two – Against: Polemical Politics 72
  • Three – Number: Calculative Politics 116
  • Taking the Measure of the Political 170
  • Subject Index 185
  • Index of Names 191
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