The Prague Spring 1968: A National Security Archive Documents Reader

By Jaromír Navrátil | Go to book overview

DOCUMENT No. 127: CPCz Central Committee Notes on Problems
Stemming from the Presence of Warsaw Pact Forces in Czechoslovakia,
September 1968

Source: Cable No. 620 (SECRET), October 4, 1968, in TsKhSD, F. 5, O. 60, D. 311,
LI. 78–86.

This document contains notes prepared for the CPCz CC Presidium by the Information Department of
the CPCz CC in late September 1968. The notes describe the clumsy attempts by Soviet troops to overcome
the peaceful resistance they encountered from Czechs and Slovaks; they also chronicle a large number of
accidents, fights, and other serious incidents involving the Warsaw Pact forces.

The Soviet embassy in Prague obtained these notes from "reliable sources, "according to the Soviet
ambassador in Czechoslovakia, S. V. Chervonenko. Chervonenko then transmitted the notes to CPSU CC
Secretary Konstantin Katushev and Soviet Defense Minister Andrei Grechko.


ON ISSUES CONNECTED WITH THE PRESENCE OF WARSAW PACT FORCES
ON THE TERRITORY OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA
Prepared on the basis of materials and communications received at the KSČ CC Department for Information, Planning, and Administration, along with some concrete first-hand observations regarding the presence of Warsaw Pact forces on the territory of our republic.Opinions of Military Servicemen, Especially Soviet ServicemenRepresentatives of the foreign troops bring up the following "arguments" to justify their presence on the territory of the ČSSR:
The troops arrived in our country at the last minute. If they had arrived just two days later, we would have been occupied by the Germans. This has been confirmed by Soviet counterintelligence.
Czechoslovak radio was able to continue broadcasting even after the liberation because it had linked up with Austrian and West German radio.
Czechoslovakia's western borders were open. Troops from the five countries arrived to defend us, since the Czechoslovak army is worthless and is totally lacking in discipline.
Dubček remains a revisionist, but now he will be forced to obey.
Minister Pavel was hopeless. How was he permitted to occupy such a high post?
In the ČSSR they are continuing to shoot at soldiers from the five countries. However, it would seem that the five have suffered no casualties.
In Czechoslovakia there are over 2 million counterrevolutionaries.
Some servicemen from the 5 countries acknowledge that there was no counterrevolution in our country, but say it could have developed into that.
In the city of Tábor measures were taken to check the water, since the representatives of the troops of the five countries expressed concern that the water had been poisoned.
Representatives of the troops of the five in the region of Chomutov say that enterprises there are stocked with weapons and that during negotiations with these entities, the representatives demand guarantees that these weapons will not be used against Soviet forces. Other demands of this sort have been going on for a whole month regarding the weapons belonging to the People's Militia.

Soviet representatives at the negotiations held in the KSČ raikom in the city of Vyskov, assert that according to official information from our citizens 120 soldiers were killed. This "fact" they adduce as evidence of the existence of counterrevolution.

-498-

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