Homer in the Twentieth Century: Between World Literature and the Western Canon

By Barbara Graziosi; Emily Greenwood | Go to book overview

List of Contributors

Gregson Davis is Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature at Duke University, where he is the Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Professor in the Humanities and Dean of Humanities. His main research foci are Latin literature of the Late Republic and contemporary Caribbean poetry (francophone and anglophone). Among his major publications are Polyhymnia: The Rhetoric of Horatian Lyric Discourse (Berkeley, 1984) and Aimé Césaire (Cambridge, 1997). He is currently writing a monograph on Virgil's Eclogues.

Simon Goldhill is Professor of Greek at Cambridge University. He has published widely on Greek literature and on the relation between Greek culture and modern culture. His most recent books are Who Needs Greek? Cultural Contests in the History of Hellenism (Cambridge, 2002); The Temple of Jerusalem (London, 2005), and Love, Sex and Tragedy: How the Ancient World Shapes our Lives (Chicago, 2005). His next book is How to Stage Greek Tragedy Today (Chicago).

Barbara Graziosi is Senior Lecturer in Classics at Durham University. She is the author of Inventing Homer: The Early Reception of Epic (Cambridge, 2002) and of shorter studies on early Greek literature and culture. She has written Homer: The Resonance of Epic (London, 2005) together with Johannes Haubold, and is currently working with him on an edition and commentary of Iliad 6 for the Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics.

Emily Greenwood is Lecturer in Greek at the University of St Andrews. She is the author of Thucydides and the Shaping of History (London, 2006) and various articles on the reception of Classics in the Caribbean. She is co-editor, with Liz Irwin, of Reading Herodotus: Studies in the Logoi of Book 5 (Cambridge, 2007) and is currently writing a book entitled Afro-Greeks: Dialogues between Caribbean Literature and Classics.

Lorna Hardwick teaches at the Open University where she is Professor of Classical Studies and Director of the Reception of Classical

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