Philosophy and Conceptual Art

By Peter Goldie; Elisabeth Schellekens | Go to book overview

Index
abstract expressionism 20, 21, 126–7, 134, 140
abstraction 205
Acconci, V. 150–2, 172, 229, 231
Action-Result proposals 47–9
actions 207–9
aesthetic ideas 101–4
aesthetic judgements 98–9
aesthetic properties 52–3, 66
aesthetic values xv-xvi, 73–6, 86
aesthetics 9
and conceptual art xv-xvi, 9–11, 51–61, 84–7
and literature 9–10
of modernism 22–3
and politics 26
Air-Conditioning Show 265
Alberro, A. 107
Alberti, L. B. 121–2, 130
All the things I know but of which I am not at the moment thinking—1.36 P.M.; 15
June 1969, New York (Barry) 112, 140, 229–30
Allais, A. 228
Anaemic Young Girls Going to Their First Communion Through a Blizzard (Allais) 228
analytic propositions 134
appearances 41–4
and Action-Result proposals 47–9
appreciation 52–3, 85–6, 89–90, 145–6, 206
of conceptual art xix-xx
failure of 253–5
focus of 75, 84, 85, 167
and sense experience 54–8, 62
Arctic Circle Shattered, The (Weiner) 112
Arnatt, K. 3–4
art
contextualization of 129–32, 141–4
folk ontology of 242–5
ideas in 87–9
and nature 106, 108–9
nature of 133–4
vehicles 13, 15–16, 76 n. 6, 145–8, 152, 154–5 see also dematerialization
Art & Language xii, xx, 31, 110–11, 198, 251–2, 257–66
institutional theatre 259–60, 261–2 see also Harrison, C.
art-form hypothesis 246–52, 253, 255
Art in the Mind exhibition 229
Art—Language 72, 249
art media xiii, 145
and art forms 246–8, 253
Art Workers Coalition 78, 81–2
art works 109
cognitive value of 166, 167
discourse-dependent 165–6, 168
and impossibilist surprise 219–21
self-reflexivity of 134–5
unreality of 120–4
and value 203–7
Arte Povera 154, 198
artistic character 207–11
artistic properties 52–3, 59–61, 66–7
artistic propositions 135
artistic value 79–81
artistic vehicle 145–6, 148, 152
Les Arts Incohérents exhibition 228
Auerbach, F. 205
Austin, J. L. 3–4
avant-garde 19–21, 228–9, 238, 259
Ayer, A. J. 93–4, 124, 134, 135

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