Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching

By Charlotte Danielson | Go to book overview

INDEX
Page numbers followed by ƒ indicate reference to a figure.
Academic content, demonstrating knowledge of (component), 3f 44–46, 4lf
Assessment
feedback and, 176
performance evaluation levels, 38–39, 41–42f
self-assessment by teachers, 168–170, 171f
supervision and evaluation of teachers, 172, 177–182, 178f 179f 180f; 181f
Assessment (component)
designing for students, 3f, 59, 61–62, 63f
using in instruction, 4f 86–88, 89f
using psychological instruments, 151f
Behavioral norms for professional interaction (component), 117f 163f
Budget (component)
for instructional specialists, 120f
for library/media specialists, 130f
maintaining and extending the library collection in accordance with, 128f
preparing and submitting reports, 120f 130f 166f
regulations and resources relating to, 142f 152f
for therapeutic specialists, 166f
Child and adolescent development, demonstrating knowledge of (component), 133f 141f 151f
classroom organization
culture for learning and, 67–68, 69f
environment of respect and rapport in, 64–66, 66f
physical space arrangements, 73–75, 76f
recordkeeping, 94–96, 97f
Classroom procedures management (component), 3f 68–71, 72f
coaching, 21, 176–177. See also instructional specialists
Collaboration (component)
in the design of instructional units and lessons, 118f 164f
to develop specialized educational programs and services, 137f
Communication (component)
with the community, 130f
establishing a culture of, 143f
with families of students, 4f 96–99, WOf, 138f 147f 157f 179f
communication, with students, 77–79, 80f
Community, communicating with the (component), 130f
components-domains interrelatedness, 31–32
components-elements-domains relationship in the framework, 3-Af
computers, appropriate use of, 36
constructivism, 15–17, 34
Content, demonstrating knowledge of (component), 3f 44–46, 47f
Coordination of work, by instructional specialists (component), 120f 166f
Counseling, demonstrating knowledge of theory and techniques (component), 141f
counselors, school, 132, 140, 141–148f
cultural competence, 33
Culture, responsibilities for establishing (component)
for communication, 143f
for health and wellness, 135f
for investigation and love of literature, 126f
for learning, 3f 67–68, 69f
library/media specialists, 126f
for ongoing instructional improvement, 116f 162f
for positive mental health, 153f
school counselors, 144f
school nurses, 135f
school psychologists, 153f
for student behavior, 144f
Delivery of Service domain for specialist positions
instructional specialists, 112–113, 118–119f
introduction, 111
library/media specialists, 122, 128–129f
school counselors, 140, 145–146f
school nurses, 123, 136–137f
school psychologists, 149–150, 155–156f
therapeutic specialists, 159, 164–165f
Discussion techniques, using in instruction (component), 4f 9, 79, 81–82, 82f
domains
components interrelatedness, 31–32
of specialist positions, 110–111. see also specific domains
of teaching responsibility, 3–4f 22–23. see also specific domains

-196-

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