Bitter Waters: Life and Work in Stalin's Russia

By Gennady Andreev-Khomiakov; Ann E. Healy | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The self-educated Neposedov -- a main protagonist in these memoirs -- used a rich, colloquial Russian that was difficult to render in English. I owe many people my thanks for their contributions to this effort.

First, I would like to thank Rebecca Ritke of Westview Press for all her editorial help, but in particular for being as enthusiastic about Gennady Andreev-Khomiakov's memoir from the start as we both still are. Westview's anonymous readers greatly improved the contents of my introduction, as did my wise colleague and friend George Enteen of Pennsylvania State University. With his vast knowledge of the collection at the University of Wisconsin-Madison library, Slavic librarian Alex Rolich saved me endless hours of searching for photo-illustrated articles about Soviet logging during the 1930s.

Several native speakers of Russian also played a major role in the translation. Julius Nissen of Milwaukee translated and explained difficult technical terminology. Vladimir Gerzanich, then of Kiev and now a visiting researcher at the University of Pennsylvania medical school, spent hours helping me with perplexing colloquial expressions and idioms, as did Iuri Baibarak. An English teacher and translator in Kiev, Iuri also carefully checked the entire translation. Early help and encouragement for the project came from John Meredig, then a graduate student in Russian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Howard Goldfinger, scholar-editor of Milwaukee, and his Russian wife, Ira Ventsel, provided similar assistance during the final stages of the manuscript's preparation. Many important services were rendered me by the University of Illinois Summer Research Laboratory on Russia and Eastern Europe. The uniquely competent and helpful staff of the University of Illinois Slavic Library gave me invaluable assistance in tracking down information about Andreev-Khomiakov and his works.

Numerous improvements in my text are the result of the keen editorial skills of Martha Walusayi. As always, my husband and colleague in the history department at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, David Healy,

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bitter Waters: Life and Work in Stalin's Russia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - A Second Birth 1
  • 2 - Squeezing Credits from Trees 27
  • 3 - Wrenches in the Works 39
  • 4 - Private Initiative, Socialist Reward 57
  • 5 - The Art of Socialist Accounting 81
  • 6 - Sabotaged by Success 105
  • 7 - Storm Clouds Gather 127
  • 8 - The Invasion 153
  • Biographical Sketch: Gennady Andreev-Khomiakov 185
  • Notes 189
  • About the Book 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 195

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.