Bob Dylan and Philosophy: It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Thinking)

By Peter Vernezze; Carl J. Porter | Go to book overview

The Mongrel Dogs

DOUG ANDERSON teaches American philosophy and history of philosophy at Penn State. His most recent work, Philosophy Americana, deals with themes in American philosophy and popular culture. In his alterlife he plays Americana music. Having played in early years with singer-songwriters John Gorka and Richard Shindell, he now beats his Froggy Bottom and Oriskany guitars in the fourth-rate bars of rural Pennsylvania for rebels, refugees, rakes, and misdemeanor outlaws.

FRANCIS J. BECKWITH, ever since he was street legal, knew he had to strengthen the things that remain. That's why he became a philosopher (Ph.D., Fordham) and then went to law school (M.J.S., Washington University, St. Louis), where he learned that to live outside the law he must be honest. He is Associate Professor in, and Associate Director of, the J.M. Dawson Institute of Church-State Studies, and Associate Professor of Church-State Studies at Baylor University, where they have Charles Darwin trapped on Highway 35. In 2002–03, he was a Visiting Fellow in Politics at Princeton University, where the locusts sang their high whining trill. His wife, Frankie, is his precious angel who can do the Georgia crawl.

ANAT BILETZKI is Professor of Philosophy at Tel Aviv University. She specializes in philosophy of language and its history, and has published books on logic, paradoxes, Hobbes, and Wittgenstein. Of no less significance for her is her work on human rights in IsraelPalestine, which has taught her much about those who have God on their side.

ELIZABETH BRAKE is assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Calgary. Her research interests are in ethics, political philosophy, and feminism. She has published articles on Kant and Hegel on marriage, on liberal neutrality, and on fathers' rights. Elizabeth doesn't have everything she needs.

MICHAEL CHIARELLO is dean of Clare College and professor of philosophy at St. Bonaventure University. He has published articles on

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