The Philosophy of Human Nature

By Howard P. Kainz | Go to book overview

Introduction

My first inclination is to entitle this book [philosophical anthro- pology]—which will in any case be its library classification. But I hesitate to do this, since the term [philosophical anthropology,] is now used in a specialized sense. It has become largely synonymous with a group of philosophical efforts placed under the umbrella designation, [existential phenomenology]—works by Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Buber, Sartre, and others. These works, quite different from one another in approach, do have some features in common. In the midst of the spread of totalitarian ide- ologies in the twentieth century, they responded by focusing on individual existence in the world as the starting point and the cen- tral issue for philosophical analysis. The keynote of such efforts has been the emphasis on introspective experience, and reliance on pure phenomenological analysis as a self-sufficient methodology. In existentialism and phenomenology, one finds occasional refer- ences to scientific developments—such as references by Sartre to Freudian psychology, or the general discussions of modern tech- nology by Heidegger—but no major efforts to incorporate con- temporary scientific data on human nature in any systematic way.

In twentieth-century Scholastic philosophy, based largely on the work of St. Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274), the branch of phi- losophy called [philosophical psychology] offered a different and somewhat systematic approach to questions about human nature. Metaphysical issues regarding human nature were considered—the relation of essence to existence in humans, the differentiation of

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Philosophy of Human Nature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1: The [Difference Question] 1
  • 2: Are There Any Distinctively Human Instincts? 15
  • 3: Can Personality Traits and Intelligence Be Inherited? 27
  • 4: Are There Any Significant Sex-Related Personality Charactersitics? 47
  • 5: The Future of Human Evolution 65
  • 6: Is Human Nature a Unity or a Duality? 81
  • 7: Human Freedom 93
  • 8: Human Development 105
  • 9: Maturity 117
  • 10: The Nature of Love 127
  • 11: Philosophy and the Paranormal 137
  • 12: Survival After Death 151
  • Epilogue - Solutions Fitting Problems 167
  • Selected Bibliography 171
  • Index 179
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.