The Philosophy of Human Nature

By Howard P. Kainz | Go to book overview

11
Philosophy and the
Paranormal

Out of my experience, such as it is (and it is limited enough), one
fixed conclusion dogmatically emerges, and that is this, that we
with our lives are like islands in the sea, or like trees in the forest.
The maple and the pine may whisper to each other with their
leaves, and Conanicut and Newport hear each other's foghorns.
But the trees also commingle their roots in the darkness under-
ground, and the islands also hang together through the ocean's
bottom. Just so there is a continuum of cosmic consciousness,
against which our individuality builds but accidental fences, and
into which our several minds plunge as into a mother-sea or reser-
voir. Our [normal] consciousness is circumscribed for adaptation
to our external earthly environment, but the fence is weak in
spots, and fitful influences from beyond leak in, showing the oth-
erwise unverifiable common connection.… When was not the
science of the future stirred to its conquering activities by the lit-
tle rebellious exceptions to the science of the present? Hardly, as
yet, has the surface of the facts called [psychic] begun to be
scratched for scientific purposes. It is through following these
facts, I am persuaded, that the greatest scientific conquests of the
coming generation will be achieved. Kühn ist das Mühen, herrlich
der Lohn!
[Valiant the effort, magnificent the rewards.]

—WILLIAM JAMES, [The Final Impressions of a Psychical
Researcher,] The American Magazine (October 1909)

-137-

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The Philosophy of Human Nature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1: The [Difference Question] 1
  • 2: Are There Any Distinctively Human Instincts? 15
  • 3: Can Personality Traits and Intelligence Be Inherited? 27
  • 4: Are There Any Significant Sex-Related Personality Charactersitics? 47
  • 5: The Future of Human Evolution 65
  • 6: Is Human Nature a Unity or a Duality? 81
  • 7: Human Freedom 93
  • 8: Human Development 105
  • 9: Maturity 117
  • 10: The Nature of Love 127
  • 11: Philosophy and the Paranormal 137
  • 12: Survival After Death 151
  • Epilogue - Solutions Fitting Problems 167
  • Selected Bibliography 171
  • Index 179
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