The Philosophy of Human Nature

By Howard P. Kainz | Go to book overview

12
Survival After Death

SOCRATES: When the dead arrive at the place to which the genius
[guardian spirit] of each severally guides them, first of all, they
submit themselves to judgment, as they have lived well and
piously or not.… Those who have been pre-eminent for holi-
ness of life are released from this earthly prison, and go to their
pure home which is above, and dwell on the true earth; and of
these, such as have duly purified themselves with philosophy
live henceforth altogether without the body, in mansions fairer
still, which are not easily to be described.

—PLATO, Phaedo

Mind … seems to be a widely different kind of soul [from animal
souls], differing as what is eternal from what is perishable; it alone
is capable of existence in isolation from all other psychic powers.
… When mind is set free from its present conditions it appears as
just what it is and nothing more: this alone is immortal and eter-
nal (we do not, however, remember its former activity because,
while mind in this sense is impassible, mind as passive [including
memory] is destructible), and without it nothing thinks.

—ARISTOTLE, De anima II:2, III:5

We feel and know that we are eternal.
—SPINOZA, Ethics.

-151-

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The Philosophy of Human Nature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1: The [Difference Question] 1
  • 2: Are There Any Distinctively Human Instincts? 15
  • 3: Can Personality Traits and Intelligence Be Inherited? 27
  • 4: Are There Any Significant Sex-Related Personality Charactersitics? 47
  • 5: The Future of Human Evolution 65
  • 6: Is Human Nature a Unity or a Duality? 81
  • 7: Human Freedom 93
  • 8: Human Development 105
  • 9: Maturity 117
  • 10: The Nature of Love 127
  • 11: Philosophy and the Paranormal 137
  • 12: Survival After Death 151
  • Epilogue - Solutions Fitting Problems 167
  • Selected Bibliography 171
  • Index 179
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