The Language of Law School: Learning to "Think like a Lawyer"

By Elizabeth Mertz | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In a fashion that ought to please followers of Carol Gilligan, I began composing the acknowledgments to this volume long before I started the book itself. This was because I have at all points felt deeply how much the work depends on a web of relationships, on the contributions of so many people to whom I feel profoundly indebted. Before I attempt to do justice to this rich relational context, let me thank two institutions, the American Bar Foundation and the Spencer Foundation, for the generous funding that made this project possible. Some of the material from Chapter 2 is reprinted by permission of The Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities, Vol. 4, pp. 168–173; portions of Chapter 4 appeared originally in Natural Histories of Discourse, edited by Michael Silverstein and Greg Urban (University of Chicago Press, pp. 229–249; © 1996 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved). Chapter 6 contains material from Language Ideologies: Practice and Theory, edited by Bambi Schieffelin, Kathryn Woolard, and Paul Kroskrity (pp. 149–162, used by permission of Oxford University Press; © 1998 by Oxford University Press), as well as material that is revised by permission from Democracy and Ethnography: Constructing Identities in Multicultural Liberal States, edited by Carol J. Greenhouse (The State University of New York Press, pp. 218–232; © 1998 by State University of New York. All rights reserved). Thanks to the editors who worked on these materials with me as well as to those who helped with articles to which I retained copyright and from which I have drawn in this volume, which appeared in the Journal of Legal Education 48(1): 1–87 (with Wamucii Njogu and Susan Gooding), and the John Marshall Law Review 34(4): 91–117. I am also grateful to the many colleagues—anonymous reviewers as well as many who are named below—who have read and commented on parts of or all of the manuscript. Greg Matoesian and Stewart Macaulay graciously provided thorough reviews of the linguistics and

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