Color-Blind Justice: Albion Tourgée and the Quest for Racial Equality from the Civil War to Plessy v. Ferguson

By Mark Elliott | Go to book overview

2
The Making of a Radical Individualist
in Ohio's Western Reserve

Must the citizen ever for a moment, or in the least degree
resign his conscience to the legislator? Why has every man a
conscience, then? … I say, break the law. Let your life be a
counter-friction to stop the machine.

—Henry David Thoreau, "Resistance to Civil
Government," 1849

Whoso would be a man must be a nonconformist… nothing
is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Self-Reliance," 1841

WHEN FREDERICK DOUGLASS DIED IN FEBRUARY OF 1895, the people of Boston called for a memorial service to honor him. Proud of its abolitionist heritage, Boston's city council chose to hold a ceremony for the great black abolitionist at Faneuil Hall, once the favored site for rallies in the heyday of the movement. Members of Douglass's family and former abolitionist colleagues spoke at the ceremony, but the task of delivering the main eulogy was given to Albion W. Tourgée. His two-hour address, delivered on December 20, 1895, was later published at the city's expense.1

Tourgée had been neither a close friend of Douglass's nor a former abolitionist. "We met occasionally as our paths crossed, here and there," Tourgée said of Douglass. "Our acquaintance was always candid, earnest, thoughtful—never continuous or intimate."2 Tourgée was not chosen to eulogize Douglass because of his personal knowledge of the man. Rather, he was chosen because he had carried on the crusading spirit of the abolitionist movement more faithfully than any other white American. Indeed, the torrent of abuse that had been recently directed at Tourgée in the press was so reminiscent of the early public reception to the abolitionists that to many he had become the "new Garrison."3

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Color-Blind Justice: Albion Tourgée and the Quest for Racial Equality from the Civil War to Plessy v. Ferguson
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 388

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.