4
MAKING A MESSIAH

Nelson Mandela's career in clandestine insurgent politics was brief. On 21 March 1960, in Sharpeville, Vereeniging, 30 policemen fired into a crowd of 5,000 killing at least 69 and wounding nearly 200. The crowd had been summoned by the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC), the African National Congress's (ANC's) new rival formed by Africanist' dissenters led by Robert Sobukwe. They contended that the ANC had been deradicalised and deracinated by its co-operation with Communists, white democrats, and Indian Gandhists. From January 1960 the PAC had proposed a militant offensive to the pass laws as an alternative to the ANC's (relatively sedate) anti-pass campaign, urging its supporters to surrender themselves without passes outside police stations. Believing that rhetorical emphasis on race pride was by itself sufficient to evoke a large following, the PAC undertook little systematic preparation. Its branches were concentrated around the steel-making centre of Vereeniging and in the African townships of Cape Town. In Sharpeville, high rents, unemployment among school drop-outs, and authoritarian officials generated angry discontent especially among young people. The ANC was weak in Sharpeville and PAC activists constructed a strong network. In Cape Town, the other centre where the PAC enjoyed a significant following, the new organisation constituted its base among squatters and migrant workers, the principal targets of fiercely applied influx control intended by the government to reduce to a minimum the African presence in the western Cape.

Most of the top ANC leaders, including Mandela, were at the Treason Trial hearings in Pretoria on the day of the massacre. Mandela spent the night of 21 March at Joe Slovo's house, together with Walter Sisulu and other ANC officials, discussing how the

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mandela: A Critical Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • List of Plates xiv
  • List of Abbreviations xvi
  • 1: Childhood and Upbringing 1
  • 2: Becoming a Notable 19
  • 3: Volunteer-In-Chief 43
  • 4: Making a Messiah 81
  • 5: Trials 103
  • 6: Prisoner 466/64 116
  • 7: Leading from Prison 147
  • 8: Messianic Politics and the Transition to Democracy 167
  • 9: Embodying the Nation 204
  • Endnotes 227
  • Chronology 252
  • Further Reading 262
  • Index 265
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 282

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.