PART THREE
North-Central California

Parts 1 and 2 dealt with the introduction of the Ghost Dance and Earth Lodge cult into northernmost California and western Oregon. The diffu- sion along the Klamath drainage and including Siletz and Grand Ronde reservations formed a close circle, the two ends of which met in northern Yurok territory. There has been, so far, no discussion of the manner in which the Ghost Dance reached north-central California, or of the way in which the Earth Lodge cult developed from Ghost Dance stimuli. Part 3 will deal with (1) fragmentary and abortive manifestations of the Ghost Dance among the Hill and Mountain Maidu; (2) the introduction of the Ghost Dance from the east along the Pit River drainage in Achomawi ter- ritory; (3) the transformation of the Ghost Dance into the Earth Lodge cult by Norelputus; (4) the diffusion of the Earth Lodge cult to the north, south, and west across the Coast Range; (5) the development of the Bole- Maru from the Earth Lodge cult by Lame Bill and Homaldo; and (6) the subsequent growth of these cults in each area. These developments oc- curred simultaneously with the movements described in preceding sec- tions. The Ghost Dance entered the Pit River area in 1871. The Earth Lodge cult reached its climax among the Pomo in 1872, and within a year the Bole-Maru was already taking shape. These cults are not traced as sepa- rate movements, but instead they are described chronologically within the various tribal groups. The necessity for such treatment will be apparent in the complex and closely interrelated nature of the material.


Mountain and Hill Maidu

There are certain hints of abortive Ghost Dance introductions into the Mountain Maidu group in the vicinity of Susanville and into the Hill Maidu group in the vicinity of Mooretown.

At Susanville, a Mountain Maidu gave the following account of a Pavi- otso attempt to convert her people to the Ghost Dance doctrine. No other informant could be found who was able to amplify this statement.

-89-

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The 1870 Ghost Dance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations viii
  • Introduction to the Nebraska Edition ix
  • Preface xxv
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One: Nevada and the Klamath Drainage 5
  • Part Two: Western Oregon 57
  • Part Three: North-Central California 89
  • Part Four: Big Head Cult 271
  • Summary of Chronology 297
  • Summary of Contents 301
  • Conclusions and Speculations 313
  • Appendix ° Informants 323
  • Notes 335
  • Index 351
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