Summary of Contents

Part 1 of this volume described the origin of the Ghost Dance among the Paviotso and its diffusion in northernmost California along the Klamath drainage. The idea of the imminent return of the dead can be attributed to Wodziwob, a shaman prophet of Walker Lake in western Nevada. He was not himself a proselytizer, but his doctrine was carried by a disciple, variously called Frank Spencer, Doctor Frank, Weneyuga, or Tsawenega. Frank Spencer converted the Washo at Carson City, the mixed Washo and Paviotso group near Reno, the Pyramid Lake Paviotso, and those on the eastern portion of Klamath Reservation who were living in close contact with part of the Modoc tribe. On the way back from Klamath Reservation, Frank Spencer also converted the Surprise Valley Paviotso in the vicinity of Fort Bidwell. The Klamath Reservation and Surprise Valley Paviotso sent delegates to visit the original dreamer, Wodziwob. If we may trust recently gathered data, the delegates returned with skeptical reports. Wodziwob repudiated some of Frank Spencer's ideas and at the same time tried to impress his guests with transparent hoaxes. As a result of these missions, the Ghost Dance was discredited among these two groups.

Meanwhile, a Modoc, Doctor George, carried the message from Klam- ath Reservation to a band of his tribesmen at Tule Lake. This group was under the leadership of Captain Jack. The following year they were em- broiled in the Modoc War, which can only indirectly be attributed to the Ghost Dance. The doctrine also spread to the Klamath tribe on the west- ern part of the reservation.

From the Tule Lake Modoc the furor spread to the Shasta, who were luke- warm in its reception, partly, I believe, because it reached them through their archenemies, the Modoc. Nevertheless, a Shasta called Sambo trans- mitted the doctrine to the upriver Karok. Reverberations of the Ghost Dance also reached Siletz and Grand Ronde reservations in Oregon. This was the result of visiting back and forth between Shasta who were still in

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The 1870 Ghost Dance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations viii
  • Introduction to the Nebraska Edition ix
  • Preface xxv
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One: Nevada and the Klamath Drainage 5
  • Part Two: Western Oregon 57
  • Part Three: North-Central California 89
  • Part Four: Big Head Cult 271
  • Summary of Chronology 297
  • Summary of Contents 301
  • Conclusions and Speculations 313
  • Appendix ° Informants 323
  • Notes 335
  • Index 351
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