The Thunder of Angels: The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the People Who Broke the Back of Jim Crow

By Donnie Williams; Wayne Greenhaw | Go to book overview

Preface
America's Bus

MY FATHER-IN-LAW, Roy Hubert Summerford, was a man's man, but he loved his daughter as much as any man could love a child. In my eyes, he was a gentle giant. Brought up in the blue-collar community of Chisholm in north Montgomery, Alabama, he was surrounded by racism most of his life. But, as far as I know, he never displayed a racist trait. Neither did he simply look the other way. On the other hand, he did not try to change that world. However, he did pass along something to his daughter Vivian, me, and his grandchildren that changed us all.

In the early 1970s Hubert read in the Montgomery Advertiser that the city bus company would soon scrap several buses that were no longer used to transport riders. From the gossip among the mechanics at the Montgomery bus station, he discovered that one of the buses was the vehicle on which Rosa Parks had been riding when she was arrested on December 1, 1955. As far as the other mechanics were concerned, it was good

-xi-

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The Thunder of Angels: The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the People Who Broke the Back of Jim Crow
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents vii
  • Author's Note ix
  • Preface - America's Bus xi
  • Preface - A Personal History xv
  • 1: Before the Beginning 1
  • 2: His Own Man 21
  • 3: A Reporter's Scoop 67
  • 4: Hanging from the Stars 89
  • 5: Rough Days and Dangerous Nights 115
  • 6: The White Preacher 137
  • 7: The White Establishment Uses the Law 147
  • 8: King on Trial 177
  • 9: In Federal Court 207
  • 10: A Long, Hot Summer 223
  • 11: [A Glorious Daybreak] 235
  • Epilogue 257
  • Acknowledgments 275
  • Notes and Sources 277
  • Bibliography 283
  • Index 287
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