The Thunder of Angels: The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the People Who Broke the Back of Jim Crow

By Donnie Williams; Wayne Greenhaw | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

DURING THE RESEARCH and writing of The Thunder of Angels many people offered worthy ideas, suggestions, and facts. The authors would like to thank all of those who gave their timely and weighty advice.

Donnie Williams wishes to especially thank his brother Doug Williams for his valued assistance and encouragement throughout this long journey.

We could not have written this book without the help of numerous librarians and archivists, both professional and amateur. We appreciate the support of Dr. Ed Bridges, director of the Alabama Department of Archives and History, and the help of his generous and gracious staff, particularly Ricki Brunner, Norwood Kerr, and Ken Tilley.

Through the years, Wayne Greenhaw has rubbed shoulders and sought advice from a large number of journalists and historians. Not least among these have been Howell Raines, Diane McWhorter, Ray Jenkins, Jack Nelson, Joe Azbell, Tom Johnson, Bob Ingram,Willy Leventhal, Frank Sikora, Jack Bass, Tom Gardner, Mills Thornton, III, and William Bradford Huie.

-275-

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The Thunder of Angels: The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the People Who Broke the Back of Jim Crow
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents vii
  • Author's Note ix
  • Preface - America's Bus xi
  • Preface - A Personal History xv
  • 1: Before the Beginning 1
  • 2: His Own Man 21
  • 3: A Reporter's Scoop 67
  • 4: Hanging from the Stars 89
  • 5: Rough Days and Dangerous Nights 115
  • 6: The White Preacher 137
  • 7: The White Establishment Uses the Law 147
  • 8: King on Trial 177
  • 9: In Federal Court 207
  • 10: A Long, Hot Summer 223
  • 11: [A Glorious Daybreak] 235
  • Epilogue 257
  • Acknowledgments 275
  • Notes and Sources 277
  • Bibliography 283
  • Index 287
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