Bringing Math Home: A Parent's Guide to Elementary School Math : Games + Activities + Projects

By Suzanne L. Churchman | Go to book overview

Content Standards

In today's mathematics curriculum, the label [Content Standards] encompasses the kind of math skills that most commonly come to mind when you think of your standard conception of [math.] For example, the standards covered in chapter 1, [Numbers and Operations,] include the computation skills of adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing, along with how our number system is set up.

You may also think of mathematics as including measurement, an area we use readily in daily life, which also happens to be another Content Standard area. You frequently need to know the length of objects or the dimensions of areas, the number of pounds needed when buying produce or meat, or a measurement of time in order to complete your daily or weekly routines. You are thus very familiar with two Content Standard areas—Number and Operations and Measurement—and are comfortable using them.

However, there are three other Content Standard areas that may seem a little daunting due to their titles: Algebra, Geometry, and Data Analysis and Probability. These areas sound like something you learned in middle or high school. Today, schools explore these areas with even the youngest of students, but at the appropriate level. The study of algebra at the elementary level is actually pre-algebra, and it lays the foundation for formal study in later years. Geometry is the study of shapes and their properties. Likewise, data analysis explores graphing and organizing information and is the forerunner for more intense study of data and statistics in high school.

All five of these Content Standard areas—Numbers and Operations, Algebra, Geometry, Measurement, and Data Analysis and Probability—contain the basic facts and skills of mathematics. They are the tools that open the door for mathematical thinking.

The first five chapters of this book, each based on one of these five Content Standards, are designed to spell out the specific skills that are taught to different age groups in elementary schools. Each skill is clearly stated, and then a discussion clarifies what is expected of a student who is mastering this skill and why it is important. This is followed by a game, activity, discussion, or project that helps teach and give practice using the skill.

The games, activities, discussions, and projects may involve a child and parent or other adult, a small group of children, or a child working alone. Hopefully, you will find that they not only improve your child's mathematical ability, but are also fun and rewarding.

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Bringing Math Home: A Parent's Guide to Elementary School Math : Games + Activities + Projects
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Acknowledgments iii
  • Contents iv
  • Introduction v
  • How to Use This Book vii
  • Content Standards 1
  • 1: Numbers and Operations 3
  • 2: Algebra 35
  • 3: Geometry 57
  • 4: Measurement 97
  • 5: Data Analysis and Probability 129
  • Process Standards 155
  • 6: Problem Solving 157
  • 7: Reasoning and Proof 173
  • 8: Communication 181
  • 9: Connections 189
  • 10: Representation 195
  • Summing It Up 201
  • Appendix 203
  • Glossary 223
  • Bibliography 229
  • Index 230
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