Bringing Math Home: A Parent's Guide to Elementary School Math : Games + Activities + Projects

By Suzanne L. Churchman | Go to book overview

5

Data Analysis
and Probability

It has been said that we are living in the Information Age. Often, the information we receive today is obsolete within a year, and sometimes even by the following week. It is therefore essential that children be taught to collect information or data on their own, so that they can answer questions whose solutions are not rote or obvious. Because there is a glut of information out there, they also need to be able to analyze data to understand its meaning and validity. Of equal importance, children need to be able to make inferences and predictions from information in order to make decisions for themselves. To that end, children need to learn that they can gather information from a variety of places—not only from books, television, and the Internet, but also from various types of graphs, charts, and tables.

Once again, the best method for youngsters to learn these concepts is by doing. Children start making surveys, collecting data, and making graphs, charts, and tables using real objects as early as kindergarten. As they progress through the grades, their analysis of data and its representations becomes more and more sophisticated.

In terms of evaluating data, children also need to learn to make judgments about an event's probability of happening. In the lower grades, today's schools informally introduce children to the concepts through the playing of games that use spinners and dice. Upper grade students learn to make judgments about an event's chances of occurring as being likely or unlikely, or to give numerical odds for an event—for example, a 1-in2 chance, or a probability of 50⁄50.

Children need to develop independent-thinking skills to successfully navigate the ocean of ever-changing data and information that has become part of our daily existence. Your child's ability to analyze data and probability is a necessary skill for him or her to become an independent thinker. You can be the guide to teach your child to question, evaluate information, make judgments, and think for him or herself. It is not necessary for you to have all the answers to your child's questions. It is all right to say, [I don't know. Let's find out.] Make the quest for solutions with your child and teach by example.

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bringing Math Home: A Parent's Guide to Elementary School Math : Games + Activities + Projects
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Acknowledgments iii
  • Contents iv
  • Introduction v
  • How to Use This Book vii
  • Content Standards 1
  • 1: Numbers and Operations 3
  • 2: Algebra 35
  • 3: Geometry 57
  • 4: Measurement 97
  • 5: Data Analysis and Probability 129
  • Process Standards 155
  • 6: Problem Solving 157
  • 7: Reasoning and Proof 173
  • 8: Communication 181
  • 9: Connections 189
  • 10: Representation 195
  • Summing It Up 201
  • Appendix 203
  • Glossary 223
  • Bibliography 229
  • Index 230
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.