Bringing Math Home: A Parent's Guide to Elementary School Math : Games + Activities + Projects

By Suzanne L. Churchman | Go to book overview

6

Problem Solving

Problem solving is an essential part of the human condition. As an adult, you begin solving problems as soon as the alarm goes off in the morning, and you finish when your day is done. True, most of these problems are small, but every grown-up faces, at some time, problems that require a variety of strategies to solve.

Small children are naturals at problem solving because everything in the world is new to them. They are full of curiosity and, often, perseverance. Have you ever watched a toddler try to reach an object on the far side of the table? At first, the youngster keeps reaching and reaching. He or she may try to climb in order to get closer. The child may move partway around the table and try again. Finally, he or she makes the connection to walk around the table to get on the same side as the object. Success—object reached! The problem was solved by trial and error, plus a lot of persistence—a quality to be nurtured as children mature.

While problem solving is found in all areas of our lives and at school in many subjects, the focus of this chapter is how problem solving relates to mathematics. For our purpose, problem solving gives kids a chance to use what they have learned in the Content areas of math and extend what they already know into new areas. If you look back at the majority of activities listed in the chapters on Content Standards, the math skills taught are set in a problem-solving context. Kids understand and remember when they [do,] instead of just memorizing.

Problem solving is the basis for mathematics in today's schools. If kids do not have the ability to solve problems, the math skills they learn are essentially useless. Children who can create a plan and implement it to solve a mathematical problem show a much greater understanding of math than kids who can simply add, subtract, multiply, and divide.

There are four main objectives for elementary students, pre-kindergarten through fifth grade, under the Problem-Solving standard:

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bringing Math Home: A Parent's Guide to Elementary School Math : Games + Activities + Projects
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Acknowledgments iii
  • Contents iv
  • Introduction v
  • How to Use This Book vii
  • Content Standards 1
  • 1: Numbers and Operations 3
  • 2: Algebra 35
  • 3: Geometry 57
  • 4: Measurement 97
  • 5: Data Analysis and Probability 129
  • Process Standards 155
  • 6: Problem Solving 157
  • 7: Reasoning and Proof 173
  • 8: Communication 181
  • 9: Connections 189
  • 10: Representation 195
  • Summing It Up 201
  • Appendix 203
  • Glossary 223
  • Bibliography 229
  • Index 230
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.