Leadership and Teams in Educational Management

By Megan Crawford; Lesley Kydd et al. | Go to book overview

7
Managing stress in educational
organizations

MEGAN CRAWFORD

This chapter looks at the concept of stress and the ways it can be managed on both an individual and institutional level. Various models of stress will be examined, and the key issues of personality, coping strategies and relationships discussed. This chapter acts as a short introduction to the field, and as a stimulus for discussion. It aims to help reflection on the definition and concept of stress. Also, managing people requires skills both in self-management, and in managing others. In order to do this, the relationship of stress to the workplace – such an important aspect of overall stress management – will be closely examined. Although the word 'stress' often has negative connotations, it must be emphasized at the outset that some stress can be positive and beneficial, and is actually necessary to make us effective in the tasks we set ourselves. Learning to recognize stress in oneself, and its nature, is the first stage of effective management.


Towards a definition

Kyriacou and Sutcliffe (1978) defined stress in teaching as the experience by a teacher of unpleasant emotions such as tension, frustration, anxiety, anger, and depression resulting from aspects of the work teachers do. They emphasize the role of the teacher's perception of the circumstances, and the degree of control s/he feels. It can be argued that most stress comes from the way that the person thinks about it and appraises it. A survey for the Industrial Society (December 1995) suggested that it is a major problem in nine out of ten workplaces, leading to rising absenteeism and low morale. Trying to achieve some common understanding of stress is by no means an easy task. Teaching is but one of many occupations in which it is claimed that the job causes excessive stress. Disagreements over what stress is may arise because when people discuss stress they are not necessarily discussing the same thing. This variation

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Leadership and Teams in Educational Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - Leading and Leadership 7
  • 1: Leadership as an Organizational Quality 9
  • 2: Dimensions of Leadership 24
  • 3: Primary Headship and Leadership 40
  • 4: Critical Leadership Studies 61
  • 5: Women in Educational Management 73
  • 6: Motivation in Education 88
  • 7: Managing Stress in Educational Organizations 103
  • 8: Managing Conflict in Organizations 110
  • Part 2 - Working in Teams 117
  • 9: Staff Teams and Their Management 119
  • 10: The Dynamics of Teams 130
  • 11: Headship and Effective Teams in the Primary School 144
  • 12: Managers Communicating 156
  • 13: Communication in Educational Management 165
  • 14: Effective Teambuilding 179
  • Index 189
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