Leadership and Teams in Educational Management

By Megan Crawford; Lesley Kydd et al. | Go to book overview

11
Headship and effective teams
in the primary school*

JOHN JOHNSTON AND SUSAN PICKERSGILL

Introduction

Central government's thrust for quality assurance has induced a changed and changing climate of expectation for schools and the management of them, and makes it imperative that managerial behaviour is centred on leadership for collegiality.

Successful primary school heads have received the messages being sent by central government and others to primary schools about how they should operate; they have had the personal and professional determination, clarity of vision, courage and personal and interpersonal skills to interpret and use the considerable powers and duties of the office wisely. In being able to bring these qualities to the development of a managerial stance, they have succeeded through and with other staff in moving their schools in the direction of collegial structures and processes and to practice that is grounded in co-operative teamwork. The translation of this stance into practice involves the interaction of personality, experience, values, dispositions, attitudes and coping strategies. Where the difficulties have been accommodated and/or overcome for the greater good, both the head and other staff have been willing and able to cope with and adjust to the plethora of changes arising from educational reform.

Arguably, a significant proportion of schools have not had the managerial impetus to make the necessary changes, despite rhetoric to the contrary. Although this may be because their heads have been unable to construct an achievable mission for the school, the evidence from PickersgilPs (1990) study of primary heads' perceptions comprehensively points to the difficulties heads report in conveying that mission to others and in attaining a commitment to it. Exactly what the specific problems are and what the solutions to them in any particular case might be would require detailed information on the individual school, its environment, traditions, how it operates and

* This material has been edited and was originally published as 'Personal and interpersonal aspects of effec-
tive team-oriented headship in the primary school'.

-144-

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Leadership and Teams in Educational Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - Leading and Leadership 7
  • 1: Leadership as an Organizational Quality 9
  • 2: Dimensions of Leadership 24
  • 3: Primary Headship and Leadership 40
  • 4: Critical Leadership Studies 61
  • 5: Women in Educational Management 73
  • 6: Motivation in Education 88
  • 7: Managing Stress in Educational Organizations 103
  • 8: Managing Conflict in Organizations 110
  • Part 2 - Working in Teams 117
  • 9: Staff Teams and Their Management 119
  • 10: The Dynamics of Teams 130
  • 11: Headship and Effective Teams in the Primary School 144
  • 12: Managers Communicating 156
  • 13: Communication in Educational Management 165
  • 14: Effective Teambuilding 179
  • Index 189
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