Leadership and Teams in Educational Management

By Megan Crawford; Lesley Kydd et al. | Go to book overview

12
Managers communicating*

COLIN HARGIE, DENNIS TOURISH AND OWEN HARGEE


Introduction

All organizations, including education organizations, now operate in a turbulent environment of constant change with little indication that such pressures will be reduced in the near future. This is forcing them to re-examine their functions, structures and internal/external relationships. As a result, effective communication has been identified as a significant factor influencing the ability of organizations to achieve their objectives (Young and Post 1993).

However, research into managerial communication practices is at an early stage. A review of the literature on managing innovation (Henry and Walker 1991) and managing change in organizations (Carnall 1990) shows that little attention has been paid to the role of communication as a variable in innovatory change. Within the UK, until recently, there has been little empirical research into the nature, flow and functions of communication within organizations (Hargie and Tourish 1993). However, there is growing interest in the role of communication as a significant variable in determining organization success (Clampitt 1991; Whetten and Cameron 1991).

In particular, there is a growing emphasis on the importance of interpersonal communication. This arises from the realization that the greatest challenges to management are not problems of setting objectives or making decisions but rather those of implementation. Successful implementation, it is argued, depends to a large extent on effective use of interpersonal communication skills (Schein 1983). The challenge of implementation is therefore a major reason why there needs to be a much greater emphasis on the role of interpersonal communication within organizations. It is now widely recognized that as an organization becomes more complex greater demands are made on the interpersonal skills of its members. Interpersonal communication is

'This material has been edited and was originally published as 'Managers communicating: an investigation
of core situations and difficulties within educational organizations'.

-156-

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Leadership and Teams in Educational Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - Leading and Leadership 7
  • 1: Leadership as an Organizational Quality 9
  • 2: Dimensions of Leadership 24
  • 3: Primary Headship and Leadership 40
  • 4: Critical Leadership Studies 61
  • 5: Women in Educational Management 73
  • 6: Motivation in Education 88
  • 7: Managing Stress in Educational Organizations 103
  • 8: Managing Conflict in Organizations 110
  • Part 2 - Working in Teams 117
  • 9: Staff Teams and Their Management 119
  • 10: The Dynamics of Teams 130
  • 11: Headship and Effective Teams in the Primary School 144
  • 12: Managers Communicating 156
  • 13: Communication in Educational Management 165
  • 14: Effective Teambuilding 179
  • Index 189
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