Palliative Care Nursing: Principles and Evidence for Practice

By Sheila Payne; Jane Seymour et al. | Go to book overview

11
Good for the soul?

The spiritual dimension of hospice and palliative care

Michael Wright

Confronting mortality in the face of approaching death may be a deeply disturbing experience (Ainsworth-Smith and Speck 1999; Lawton 2000). Yet amidst the imminence of separation and the disintegration of self, a wellspring of spiritual activity may frequently be found. In this chapter, I address such activity from three perspectives: the conceptual perspective, the patient and family perspective and the institutional perspective. I will show that as dying patients address their spiritual and religious needs, health professionals have an opportunity to play a vital and supportive role. Where appropriate, data will be presented from a doctoral study1 undertaken by the author between 1998 and 2001 (Wright 2001a).


The conceptual perspective

Background

When Cicely Saunders founded St Christopher's Hospice (Sydenham) in 1967, she sought to recapture the spirit of the former Christian 'hospices', welcoming the sick and performing the works of mercy found in Matthew 25 verses 35 and 362 (Saunders 1986). At this time, her evangelical zeal was probably at its highest. In a letter to the Reverend Bruce Reed, she tellingly wrote: 'I long to bring patients to know the Lord' (Clark 1998: 50). Yet Dr Saunders did not establish a religious community, preferring instead to pioneer a new pattern of relationships exemplified by the multidisciplinary team.

As hospice philosophy developed, however, questions came to be asked about its religious foundations. Was the Christian perspective part of the essence of hospice, or did it merely provide a motivating force among likeminded pioneers? The debate surrounding these questions was influenced by three factors: the establishment of palliative care, a changing pattern of

-218-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Palliative Care Nursing: Principles and Evidence for Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 792

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.