Palliative Care Nursing: Principles and Evidence for Practice

By Sheila Payne; Jane Seymour et al. | Go to book overview

30
Overview

Christine Ingleton and Jane Seymour

Changes in population demographics, health needs and reforms in healthcare delivery and work practices have had a major impact on the nursing profession in many developed countries. Moreover, the transfer of nurse education into higher education in the UK over the last decade and in North America over the past 20 years has heralded substantial changes in the way nurses are educated and prepared for practice. Nurse education in Australia has also experienced significant changes since the 1980s, including transfer of undergraduate preparation from hospital-based programmes to more formal learning in the tertiary sector and, more recently, growth in postgraduate degrees and clinical specialization (Lee et al. 2002).

In the UK, before the radical revision of the education strategy called Project 2000 (UKCC 1987), nurses were taught in training schools attached to hospitals. Two levels of qualification existed, enrolled and registered, and separate courses educated trainees for four areas of nursing: general (adult), sick children, mental health and mental handicap. Over 60 per cent of trainees' time was spent in providing rostered service, during which time they were responsible to a service manager. Thus nurse training has moved from an apprenticeship model of preparation where trainees worked as 'pairs of hands' to an educationally driven model of preparation where students attend university-based courses.

The need for reform in nursing in the UK emerged from challenges in four main areas: education, service, recruitment and retention, and changes both in health needs and in the NHS. The reforms impacted both upon education and service provision. Educationally, diploma level education was introduced, replacing the previous two-tier system of enrolled and registered nurses. The four specialist routes to qualification were replaced by a Common Foundation Programme (12–18 months) followed by a branch programme in a chosen specialism. Students are now provided with a bursary rather than a salary and are responsible to educationalists rather than service managers.

-579-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Palliative Care Nursing: Principles and Evidence for Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 792

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.