The Power of Critical Theory for Adult Learning and Teaching

By Stephen D. Brookfield | Go to book overview

Subject
A
AAACE (American Association for Adult and Continuing Education), 121, 138, 305
AAAE (Australian Association for Adult Education), 121
Abstract conceptual thought, 194–195
ACACE(Advisory Council for Adult and Continuing Education), 221
Active hegemony, 113–115
Adult educationAfricentric paradigm as alternative discourse in, 306–310; application of panopticon to, 136–137; applying Gramscian protocol for, 112–113; commodification process in, 167; as communitarian socialism, 158; creating opportunities for privacy/isolation in, 199–200; Davis' writings on liberatory power of, 341–342; democratic ideal embraced by, 60–64; development of specialized discourse in, 186–187; feminist attempts to fight patriarchy through, 322; Foucaltian perspective on power in, 126–129; Fromm on structuralized view of world function of, 173–175; Fromm's outline of political literacy project for, 168–169; Fromm's promotion and belief in, 153–154; Gramsci's worker activism analysis and, 108; as ideological state apparatus, 85–87; influence of Habermas on North American, 273–274; learning about democracy as core of residential, 270–273; learning to

defend lifeworld as project of, 223; lessons from Davis' analysis of collective struggle for, 344–351; lifeworld discourse of, 56–59; Newman's case for active hegemony in, 113–115; Newman's criticism of liberal-humanist hegemony in, 113; as practice of liberating tolerance, 210–218; race composition in classrooms of, 278–279

Adult Education: Evolution and Achievements in a Developing Field of Study (Peters, Jarvis, and Associates), 278
Adult Education Research Conference (AERC), 17, 236, 278
Adult educators:" A Critical Theory of Adult Learning and Education" (Mezirow) influence on, 221–222; Baptiste's argument for ethical pedagogy of coercion in, 115–116; the circle and, 130–131; exercise of power by, 332–333; faith in convictions and practices of, 180–181; Fromm on character of teachers, 178; Fromm's warning against majority vote used by, 169–170; impostership myth exposed by, 372–373; as organic intellectuals, 108–112; power and resistance and role of, 139–144; practice of loving adult pedagogy by, 179; repressive tolerance encountered by, 374; teaching critically, 352–376
Adult learning:avenues of democratic, 270–273; as communicative action, 253–257; as democratic

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