The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
PART B

Composers from English-Speaking Countries

AUSTRALIA

Margaret Sutherland (1897–1984)

Peggy Glanville Hicks (1912–90)

Dulcie Holland (1913–2000)

Miriam Hyde (1913–2005)

Ros Bandt

Alison Bauld

Betty Beath

Anne Elizabeth Boyd

Ann Carr-Boyd

Margaret Brandman

Mary Finsterer

Jennifer Fowler

Helen Gifford

Moya Henderson

Sarah Hopkins

Elena Kats-Chemin

Liza Lim

Mary Mageau

Cathie Travers

NEW ZEALAND

Annea Lockwood

Gillian Whitehead

CANADA

Sophie-Carmen Eckhardt-Gramatté (1899–1974)

Violet Archer (1913–2000)

Jean Coulthard (1908–2000)

Barbara Pentland (1912–2000)

Micheline Coulombe Saint-Marcoux (1938–85)

Diane Chouinard

Vivian Fung

Alice Ho

Melissa Hui

Hope Lee

Alexina Louie

Ramona Luengen

Svetlana Maksimovic

Kelly-Marie Murphy

Juliet Palmer

DeirdreJ. Piper

Elizabeth Raum

Anita Sleeman

SOUTH AFRICA

Priaulx Rainier (1903–86)

Jeanne Zaidel-Rudolph

By the 19th century, after over a hundred years of colonization, the British Empire covered 25 percent of the world's area and population. As a generation of white settlers was born overseas and able to govern themselves, "Dominions" were formed, the first being Canada in 1867, followed by Australia (1900), New Zealand (1907) and South Africa (1910). Still part of the British Commonwealth they answered to the government in London regarding foreign policy, and were conscripted to fight in WWI. Gradually complete independence was attained by most countries, many of whom sent men to serve in WWII of their own volition. Today, there exists a free association of forty-nine former British colonies in the "Commonwealth of Nations." Most retain English as a common language, albeit in differing accents and forms of pronunciation. Australia and New Zealand still feature a miniature version of the British Union Jack in the upper left hand corner of their flags, and profess some allegiance to British royalty.

In the history of composers from these major English-speaking countries, tradition and opportunities continue to draw many to study in London at the Royal Academy (RAM) or the Royal College of Music (RCM), as well as

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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