The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX

The Second New England

Clara Kathleen Rogers (1844–1931) Helen Hopekirk (1856–1945) Margaret Ruthven Lang (1867–1972) Amy Beach (1867–1944) Mabel Daniels (1878–1971)

The nucleus of music in colonial America was Boston. William Billings (1746–1800) is considered the "Father of New England Music," and early American composers, most of whom wrote church music and songs, have been grouped into what is known as the New England School. Not until three quarters of a century later did another group of American composers emerge, and by virtue of being born or settling in the same geographical location, were dubbed the Second New England School. Led by John Knowles Paine (1839–1906), Harvard's first professor of music and the first to hold such a position in the country, and George Whitefield Chadwick (1854–1931), director of the New England Conservatory, the group included Arthur Foote (1853–1937), Edward MacDowell (1860–1908), Frederick Shepherd Converse (1871–1940), John Alden Carpenter (1876–1951) and five prominent women. Part of the school, yet standing alone as the American forerunner of modern music, was Charles Ives (1854–1954), the only member educated exclusively in America.

Amongst them they amassed a repository of symphonies, orchestral works, organ music, oratorios, chamber and choral works, songs, piano pieces, etc., forming a foundation for American music, although all but Ives had engaged in periods of study in Europe. MacDowell, Converse, and Carpenter were pupils of Paine. Margaret Ruthven Lang and Mabel Daniels studied with Chadwick.


The Women of the Second New England School

These ladies had much in common: each came from well-to-do families, each was encouraged in her aspirations and each studied in Europe with leading pedagogues of the day. Those who married had the support of their husbands to continue their career. Most importantly, each was successful, respected and ran into very little gender bias.

CLARA KATHLEEN BARNETT ROGERS, born January 14, 1844, in Cheltenham, England, was the granddaughter of cellist Robert Lindley and daughter of composer John Barnett. She received musical instruction from her parents before entering the Leipzig Conservatory at age twelve,31 where she studied harmony with Paperitz and E.E Richter, singing with Hermann Goetz and composition with Louis Plaidy and Ignaz Moscheles (1794–1870), a friend of Beethoven and student of Antonio Salieri (1750–1825). The youngest student the conservatory had ever accepted, she graduated in 1860 deciding to concentrate on singing as a career. After further lessons in Berlin and Milan, she made her debut in Turin under the name Clara Doria. She spent several years as an opera singer in Italy before returning to London in 1866 to continue her concert career. In 1871, she went on a U.S. tour with the Parepa-Rosa Opera Company. The following year she settled in

31. Like many prodigies, Clara's mother put her child's career before her marriage, and lived with her daughter in Europe.

-179-

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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