The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN

Pen Women in Music

Carrie Jacobs Bond (1862–1946)

Amy Beach (1867–1944)

Mary Carr Moore (1873–1957)

Mary Carlisle Howe (1882–1964)

Beth Joerger-Jenson (7–1991)

Elinor Remick Warren (1900–91)

Dorothy Dushkin (1903–92)

Radie Britain (1903–94)

Harriet Bolz (1909–95)

Julia Smith (1911–89)

Roslyn Pettibone (1912–93)

Vera N. Preobrajenska (?)

Marion Money Richter (1900–96)

Minuetta Kessler (1914–2002)

Nancy Faxon (1914–2005)

Arwin Sexauer(1921–92)

Jeanne Singer(1924–2000)

Nancy Reed (1924–2000)

Sarah Bennett

Louise Canepa

Frances Chadwick

Nancy Deussen

Sheila Firestone

Genevieve Fritter Bieber

Beverly Glazier

Lucille Greenfield

Joanne Hammil

Jane Hart

Marguerite Havey

Winifred Hyson

Elizabeth Lauer

Bette Miller

Elizabeth Nicols

Linda Ostrander

Julie Rivers

Eugénie RocheroUe

Dorothy Ross

Gail Smith

Marjorie Tayloe

Marilyn Thies

Wang An-Ming

Harriet Woodcock

Celebrating its Centennial in 1997, the National League of American Pen Women (NLAPW) was founded June 26, 1897, a time when women were barred from the National Press Club in the nation's capital. Three professionals, Marion Longfellow O'Donohue, a poet and reporter for the Boston Transcript, Boston Herald and Washington Post, and niece of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Margaret Sullivan Burke, the first woman to be admitted into the Press Gallery36 of the Houses of Congress as an accredited telegraphic correspondent, and Anna Sanborne Hamilton, social editor of the Washington Post and special proofreader for the U.S. government, met with fourteen other ladies to found the League of American Pen Women. With twenty charter members, the league's original aim was to create a forum for women journalists, authors and illustrators "to promote … action … on libel law, copyright laws, plagiarism and for inspiration and mutual aid." When a music category was added in 1916, among its first prestigious members was Amy Beach, leading a line of prolific women composers such as Mary Howe, Carrie Jacobs Bond, Elinor Remick Warren, Radie Britain and Julia Smith, who were followed by contemporaries, Jeanne Singer, Eugénie Rocherolle, and others. Their first convention was held April 1921, with President and Mrs. Warren G. Harding, herself a member, in the receiving line. Subsequent first lady members include Edith Boiling Wilson, Grace Coolidge, Eleanor Roosevelt, Rosalynn Carter, Barbara Bush, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Laura Bush. Over the decades branches have sprung

36. The Press Gallery was established in 1877 from which women were also originally prohibited.

-185-

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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