The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ELEVEN
PART A

Wielding the Small Stick

A woman must be better than a man if she is to conduct prestigious groups, and I made it my career always to be 100
percent prepared and know all scores tremendously well.

—Frédérique Petrides

Eva Vale Anderson (1893–1985), Long Beach Women's Symphony

Ebba Sundstrom (1896–1963), Women's Symphony Orchestra of Chicago

D'Zama Murielle, Portland Women's Symphony

Emma Steiner (1852–1929), Operetta Conductor

Mabel Swint Ewer, Philadelphia Women's Symphony

Josephine Weinlich (1848–87), Vienna Ladies' Orchestra

Carmen Studer (1907-?), European Guest Conductor

Gertrude Herliczka (1902-?), U.S./European Guest Conductor

Elizabeth Kuyper (1877–1953), Women's Orchestra, Berlin

Alma Rosé (1906–1944), Wiener Mädeln Orkester

Jane Evrard (1893–1984), Women's Orchestra of Paris

Marie Wilson (1903-?), BBC Promenade Concert Orchestra

Caroline B. Nichols (1864–1939), Boston Fadette Ladies' Orchestra

Gena Branscombe (1881–1977), Branscombe Chorale

Ethel Leginska (1886–1970), Boston Women's Orchestra

Nadia Boulanger (1887–1979), Guest Conductor

Antonia Brico (1902–89), Denver Businessmen's Orchestra, Brico Symphony

Frédérique Petrides (1903–83), Orchestrette Classique

Ruth Thall Quinn (1920-), Columbus (Ohio) Miniature Symphony

Sarah Caldwell (1924–2006), Boston City Opera, Global Guest Conductor

Margaret Hillis (1921–1998), Chicago Symphony Chorus, Elgin (Illinois) Symphony

Judith Somogi (1937–1988), Frankfurt Opera

Iona Brown (1941–2004), Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, Norwegian Chamber Orchestra

The history of women conductors can be traced to the proliferation of all-women orchestras that were formed around the same time as the founding of three major American music schools. The Institute of Musical Art in New York came first, in 1905, in order to establish an academy to rival European conservatories. When wealthy textile merchant Augustus D. Juilliard died in 1919, his will contained the largest single bequest for the advancement of music at that time. Thus the Juilliard Graduate School came into being in 1924, merging with the Institute in 1926, to become the Juilliard School of Music. In 1921, the Eastman School of Music, Rochester (upstate New York), was founded by photography pioneer/philanthropist George Eastman (1854–1932). The Curtis Institute in Philadelphia followed in 1924, through the generosity of Mary Louise Curtis Bok. (See The Unforgotten.) As these institutions poured out accomplished women performers who literally had no place to

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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