The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ELEVEN
PART F

Around the World with a Few Women

The following is a 2000 survey of worldwide major orchestras who responded to my request for rosters in order to determine the ratio of men to women. The profiles of two American women who made it into European orchestras, Abbie Conant (former trombone, Munich Philharmonic), and Julia Studebaker (First Horn, Amsterdam Concertgebouw) are included in the Brass Section, as is Norwegian Froydis Ree Wekre (former principal Horn, Oslo Philharmonic). Extra information is given when available. The numbers speak for themselves.

BBCSymphony (London) JiríBelohlávek ('06-)LeonardSlatkin (2000–05)(33 women out of 91)
ViolinDavidRobertson -principal guest ('05) Anna Colman Dawn Nellorprincipal second violins co-principal second violins
ViolaCaroline Harrisonco-principal
CelloSusan Monksco-principal
HarpSioned Williams Louise Martinprincipal co-principal
FlutePatricia Morrispiccol
BassoonRachel GoughClare Glenisterco-principalcontra bassoon
Berlin PhilharmonicSir Simon Rattle(13 womenout of 117)

This orchestra, founded in 1882, has had some of the foremost conductors in musical history: Hans von Biilow, Arthur Nikisch, and Wilhelm Furtwangler. After WWII, the orchestra and musical life in Berlin was rebuilt. Sergiu Celibidache conducted, then a return of Furtwangler, and in 1955, Herbert von Karajan became permanent conductor until April 1989, just four months before his death.

Other than a harpist, there are no principal chairs filled by women. Sabine Meyer was solo clarinet, but only for one year (1983–84). The first woman hired was Madeleine Carruzzo, in 1982, one hundred years after the founding of the orchestra. Of the eighteen women who have played since 1982, here are the ten current members.

ViolinMaja Avramovic Susanne Calgéer Madeleine Carruzzo Kotowa Machida Ursula Schoch Eva-Maria Tomasi1994 1988 1982 1997 1998 1990
ViolaTanja Schneider1993
HarpMarie-Pierre Langlamet1993

-415-

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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