The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWELVE
PART G

Women to the Winds

RECORDER

Michala Petri

Marion Verbruggen

FLUTE

Lois Schaefer

Jeanne Baxtresser

Leone Buyse

Doriot Anthony Dwyer

Susan Milan

Yoki Owada

Susan Palma

Marina Piccinini

Paula Robison

Er'ella Talmi

Carol Wincenc

Eugenia Zukerman

CLARINET

Thea King

Emma Johnson

Sabine Meyer

Orit Orbach

BASSET HORN

Georgina Dobree

OBOE

Marsha Heller

Pamela Pecha

BASSOON

Julie Feves

Nancy Goeres

Judith LeClair

CONTRA BASSOON

Susan Nigro

SAXOPHONE

Cynthia Sikes

Karolina Strassmayer

Leigh Pilzer

Anat Cohen

Scheila Gonzalez

Lisa Parrott

Jane Ira Bloom


Tootling From the Beginning of Time

Wind instruments date from prehistory. Stemming from nature, they were made of animal horns, bones, wood, shell—even stone. It was man's ingenuity, however, to bore holes, join pipes together and add other accessories to enable the player to produce a range of tone and melody.

The position of women as priestesses in ancient civilizations, their contribution to music in the cloisters of die Middle Ages, as troubadours—jongleuresses, trobairitz—of 12th and 13th century Europe, and their presence in the courts of Renaissance nobility eventually led to the beginnings of public performance. This progression, dating back to depictions of Greek women playing the aulos—forerunner of the oboe—and other early winds such as the recorder, cromone (crumhorn), shawm (another ancestor of the oboe), bass shawm (early bassoon) and chalumeau—which led to the invention of the clarinet—indicates that women have long been making music on wind instruments. The transverse flute—played horizontally—came from Byzantium and Slavic countries, spreading to western Europe where, in the Middle Ages, it was primarily a military instrument. The vertical flute (flageolet), made of wood, was of Asian origin, and found its way west around the 11th century The

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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