The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWELVE
PART J

The Harpsichord still sings

Elizabeth Chojnazka

Elaine Comparone

Alice Ehlers

Wanda Landowska

Sylvia Marlowe

Jennifer Paul

Yella Pessel

Zuzana Ruzickova

Lotta Van Buren

Developed in Europe in the 14th or 15th century, harpsichords were widely used from the 16th until early 19th century, when they was superseded by the stronger sounding piano. During the 18th century, harpsichords were built in France by the Blanchet family, in Germany by the Hass family, and in England by Jacob Kirkman. The outbreak of the French Revolution (1789) marked the end of harpsichord building in France. The Paris Conservatory gave its last harpsichord prize in 1798. The last known Kirkman instrument was built in England in 1809.

It was Arnold Dolmetsch (1858–1940) who laid the foundation for the reincarnation of the harpsichord. His life goal was the interpretation of the music of the past on authentic instruments. Born in France, after completing his musical studies in Brussels, 1883, he moved to London and attended the RCM. By 1894 he had built his own harpsichord, and began giving concerts of early music. In 1902, he came to the U.S. for a two-mondi concert tour. He returned in 1904 for a seven week tour, whose success kept it expanding with added engagements. Support was so great, he decided to make his home in America. He settled in Boston (1905–11), concertizing and working for the Chickering Piano Company building harpsichords. When the company fell victim to the 1910 economic depression, he returned to England, continued to make instruments, and in 1915 published a book on 17th and 18th century music—the groundwork for the resurgence of interest in early music. This bore fruit in the talented artists who made the harpsichord their instrument.

LOTTA VAN BUREN (1877–1960) benefitted from Dolmetsch's research. Her father was a nephew of the eighth president, Martin Van Buren. She studied piano, and in 1912 went to Germany to do research on Wagner. On her return, she spent time with Dolmetsch in England, learning how to repair the harpsichord she had purchased from him earlier. Beginning in 1922, she gave lectures on Wagner and his music, and also devised a series of lecture-recitals featuring 17th and 18th century harpsichord music. Her interest in the music and instruments expanded to restoration techniques, which became an important part of her subsequent career. She returned to England in the summers of 1923, '24, and '25, to again work widi Dolmetsch. Back in the U.S., she restored instruments in the Morris Steinert Collection for Yale University, Cooper Union Collection, Joline Collection at Barnard College, and John D. Rockefeller's Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia. She continued touring with private concerts

-608-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 1055

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.