The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWELVE
PART L

Mastering the King of Instuments

Sophia Hewitt (1799–1845)

Elfrida Andree (1871–1929)

Roberta Bitgood (1908-retired

Lady Susi Jeans (1911–1993)

Claire Coci (1912–78)

Catharine Crozier (1914–2002)

Jeanne Marie Madeleine Demessieux (1921–68)

Marie-Madeleine Durufle (1921–99)

21ST CENTURY

Marie-Claire Alain

Diane Meredith Belcher

Diane Bish

Beth Chenault

Lynne Louise Davis

Carla Edwards

Janette Fishell

Roberta Gary

Nancy Granert

Judith Hancock

Yanka Hekima

Wilma Jensen

Joyce Jones

Marilyn Keiser

Margaret McElwain Kemper

Kei Koito

Susan Landale

Joan Lippincott

Karen McFarlane

Marilyn Mason

Dorothy Papadakos

Jane Parker-Smith

Mary Preston

Christa Radich

Cherry Rhodes

Victoria Sirota

Ann Elise Smoot

Sandra Soderlund

Phyllis J. Stringham

Carole Terry

Marianne Webb

Dame Gillian Weir

Carol Williams

Anne Wilson

THE FUTURE

Chelsea Chen

Dating back two thousand years, the organ has been associated with Roman gladiators, medieval monarchs, the church, and in theater design, accompanying silent movies, radio plays, television "soap operas," plus enjoying popularity in concert recitals spanning the 1920s to the '50s. In the 12th century, players carried portative organs— looking like accordions—with a strap. Small reed organs similar to harmoniums graced wealthy 16th century homes. The peak of organ music was the baroque period from the early 1600s to the middle 1700s. Called "the king of instruments" because it can imitate an entire orchestra, it was the means of livelihood and inspiration for early baroque and classical composers like Dietrich Buxtehude and J.S. Bach (Germany), George Frideric Handel (England), Jan Sweelinck (Holland), Giralmo Frescobaldi, Domenico Gabrieli and Tomaso Albinoni (Italy), Francois Couperin, Jean Titelouze, Nicolas de Brigny and Louis Marchand (France), and Juan Bautista Cabanilles (Spain), who freed it from church service exclusivity and gave it new dimensions in the recital sphere—albeit that concerts still had to be performed in churches.

These innovators were followed a century later by Charles Widor, Cesar Franck, Camille Saint-Saens and other (mostly) French composers. The organ's multiplicity evolved musical forms such as the fugue, toccata, partita,

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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