The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
PART B

Into the 20th Centry

1900 to 1929

Jennie Tourel (1900–73)

EraaBerger (1900–90)

Gladys Swarthout (1900–69)

Bidú Sayāo (1902–99)

Jeanette MacDonald (1903–65)

Zinka Milanov (1906–89)

Elena Nikolaidi (1906–2002)

Marjorie Lawrence (1907–79)

Jarmila Novotná (1907–94)

Rose Bampton (1908-)

Licia Albanese (1909-)

Dorothy Kirsten (1910–92)

Magda Olivero (1910-)

Kathleen Ferrier (1912–53)

Ljuba Welitsch (1913–96)

Rise Stevens (1913-)

Eleanor Steber (1914–90)

Janine Micheau (1914–76)

Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (1915–2006)

Hilde Giiden (1917–88)

Birgit Nilsson (1918–2005)

Mado Robin (1918–60)

Blanche Thebom (1918-)

Frances Bible (1919–2001)

Lisa Delia Casa (1919-)

Eileen Farrell (1920–2002)

Nan Merriman (1920-)

Phyllis Curtin (1921-)

Renata Tebaldi (1922–2004)

Regina Resnik (1922-)

Victoria de Los Angeles (1923–2005)

Mimi Benzell (1922–70)

Maria Callas (1923–77)

Nell Rankin (1923–2005)

Christa Ludwig (1924-)

Patrice Munsel (1925-)

Leonie Rysanek (1926–98)

Joan Sutherland (1926-)

Galina Vishnevskaya (1926-)

Regine Crespin (1927-)

Pilar Lorengar (1928–96)

Rosalind Elias (1929-)

Beverly Sills (1929-)

Gabriella Tucci (1929-)

Of those born in the two decades before the World War II, most retired from their stage careers before the turn of the 21st century. Some have gone into teaching, some, like Beverly Sills until 2005, into directing or other administrative work within the field, while others rest on their well-earned laurels.


Those Who Have Left Us

MIMI BENZELL, born April 6, 1922, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, was exposed to music early in life. Her grandfather, who emigrated from Russia, was a Jewish folk singer. After studies at New York's Mannes College of Music, she made her professional debut at a Mozart festival in Mexico City under the baton of Sir Thomas Beecham. Her Met debut was January 5, 1945, as the Queen of the Night in The Magic Flute, and in the course of the next five years sang eighteen roles in ninety-seven performances there, including Gilda and Musetta. In 1949, she switched careers and appeared in nightclubs and Broadway shows, including Milk and Honey (1961). Her last project was

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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