The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
PART F

Other Fine Voices

Evelyn Buehler Snow

Christine Akre

Patricia Bardon

Efrat Ben-Nun

Ann Benson

Cathy Berberian

Jill Blalock

Dinah Bryant

Elisabeth Canis

Patricia Chiti

Cynthia Clayton

Priscilla Gale

Isabelle Ganz

Veronique Gens

Suzanna Guzman

Constance Hauman

Pamela Hinchman

Elizabeth Holleque

Catherine Ireland

Heulwen Jones

Liuba Kazarnovskaya

Joan LaBarbara

Patricia McAfee

Diana Montague

Rosemary Museleno

Carol Plantamura

Laura Portune

Patricia Prunty

Georgetta Psaros

Adrien Raynier

Teresa Ringholz

Amanda Roocroft

Pamela Sanabria

Kathleen Shimeta

Paulina Stark

Virginia Sublett

Elzbieta Szmytka

Jeanine Thames

Melissa Thorburn

Awilda Verdejo

Elisabeth von Trapp

Sylvia Wen

Jan Wilson

Patricia Wise

Sheila Wormer

START OF A CAREER

Priti Ghandi

Montsarrat Verdugo

UNUSUAL VOICES

Cynthia Karp

Joan Morris

Linda Hohenfeld

Lakshmi Shankar

Umm Kulthum

Yma Sumac

Just as smaller cities boast competent orchestras, so there are many fine vocalists—it is impossible to list them all—who grace opera companies other than the Met, Covent Garden or La Scala. They pursue viable careers off the main circuits, or sing comprimaria roles—secondary characters—or solo in church services. Some of the following may also be on their way to the "majors" …


A Voice From the Past

Evelyn Buehler Snow was, for several years around 1913, a contralto soloist with the Tabernacle Choir under Welsh director Evan Stephens (1890–1916), and organist Alexander Shreiner. Born in Manti, Utah, May 23, 1892, her parents were very strict Mormons. She grew up with seven brothers and sisters. At age twenty-two she left for New York—a daring move for a woman in those days. There she studied at the Parnassus Club with Lotte Lehman, who offered her a scholarship to study in Germany. This she declined in favor of marriage to a handsome lad named Chauncey E. Snow. They had met while he was attending law school at Columbia University.

The couple moved to Hollywood where Snow set up his law practice. Chauncey played the sometimes accompanied his wife. Both loved the opera and had a huge collection of scores. Evelyn kept

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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