The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
PART A

American Musicologists

Sophie Drinker (1888–1967)

Diane Jezic (1942–89)

Carolyn Abbate

Christine Ammer

Linda Austern

Elaine Barkin

Jane Bernstein

Pamela Blevins

Adrienne Fried Block

Edith Borroff

Jane Bowers

Kristine Burns

Marcia Citron

Eileen Cline

Susan Cook

Suzanne Cusick

Marietta Dean

Cecilia Dunoyer

Nancy Fierro

Metche Franke

Bea Friedland

Halina Goldberg

Jane Gottlieb

Bonnie Grice

Beverly Grigsby

Jan Bell Groh

Lydia Hamessley

Deborah Hayes

Elizabeth Hinkle-Turner

Barbara Jackson

Barbara Jepson

Deborah Kavasch

Rosemary Killam

Ellen Koskoff

Laura Kuhn

Jane Weiner LePage

Kimberley Marshall

Susan McClary

Eve Meyer

Carol Neuls-Bates

Carol Oja

Karin Pendle

Joan Peyser

Marianne Richert Pfau

Susan Pickett

Carol Plantamura

Jeannie Pool

Deon Nielsen Price

Nancy Reich

Sally Reid

Ellen Rosand

Judith Rosen

Leonie Rosenstiel

Julie Anne Sadie

Karen Shaffer

Victoria Sirota

Catherine Smith

Ruth Solie

Carmen Tellez

Judith Tick

Judy Tsou

Mary Jeanne van Appledorn

Heidi von Gunden

Helen Walker-Hill

Gretchen Wheelock

Wanda Wilk

Elizabeth Wood

Judith Lang Zaimont

Alicia Zizzo

Musicologists represent a very special classification of women in music. Most are professors in conservatories and universities who, besides teaching, publish books and scholarly articles on myriad subjects relating to music. Internet websites, Who's Who in Music and other source books give only the barest details about these dedicated pedagogues. The majority manage a home life with husbands and children, while contributing a wealth of information and devoting themselves to their field. (Many, like this author, spend years of research to bring out one book!)

Whereas the traditional definition of musicologist has been "a musical historian," with the world becoming a global village there are now new perspectives in this diverse field. Ethnomusicologists, in particular, concentrate on non-Western and other multi-cultural aspects of music. Given the ever-increasing freedom of sexual expression, there has been a spate of literature propounding original thinking pertaining to gender and sexuality, which attempts to shed light on the anthropological, biological, social and sexual reasons why women (and men) wrote and write music as they do.

Traditional musicological history, sometimes facetiously referred to as "the music of dead, white males," left women in the margins. They cropped up now and then, in convents, in the courts of Renaissance Italy, and

-830-

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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