The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIFTEEN
PART B

Lady Phantoms of the Opera

OPERA COMPANIES

Sarah Billinghurst

Janet Bookspan

Mary Brinegar

Ann Campbell

Joan Dornemann

Marianne Flettner

Carole Fox/Ardis Krainik

Christine Hunter

Margaret Juntwait

Elizabeth Kennedy

Koraljka Lockhart

Janice Mancini Del Sesto

Patricia Mitchell

Eve Queler

Pamela Rosenberg

Christine Scheppelmann

"    "

Marilyn Shapiro

Beverly Sills

Kim Witman

MET

Dallas

San Diego

MET

San Diego

Chicago Lyric

MET

MET

Los Angeles

San Francisco

Boston Lyric

Los Angeles

Opera Orchestra of New York

San Francisco

San Francisco

Washington National

MET

MET

Wolf Trap

Assistant Manager

Stage Director

Former Associate General Director

Director of Strategic Planning

Coach/Prompter

Artistic Administrator

Founder/Director

Chairman (2005-)

Announcer/Commentator

Director of Administration

PR & Data (1970–74, 1983–2004)

General Director

Executive Director (1995–2000)

Founder/Executive Director

General Director (2001–05)

Artistic Administrator (1994–2001)

"   " (2002-)

PR, Assistant Mgr., Exec. Dir. (1975–2000)

Chairman (2003–05)

Coach (1985-), General Dir. (1997-)

STAGING AND DIRECTING

Jeannette Aster

Gigi Capobianco

Marta Domingo

Sonja Frisell

Rhoda Levine

Karen Stone

Julie Taymor

Francesca Zambello

Rarely seen onstage, women in opera companies throughout the world work alongside men in infinite capacities of artistic direction and production to put together the spectacular extravaganzas that involve us in fantastic plots peopled with larger-than-life characters inhabiting imaginary kingdoms—all a part of what may be cultured society's most ostentatious and expensive, but passionately soul-stirring art form. The following ladies are but a few among the many, in the Business of Opera.

SARAH BILLINGHURSTFrom Kiwi Fruit and Orange Groves to the Big Apple; when she became assistant manager of the Metropolitan Opera in August 1994, Sarah Billinghurst brought with her twenty-two years of experience at San Francisco Opera under three administrations. She joined SFO in 1972 as assistant to artistic administrator Kurt Herbert Adler (1905–88), graduating to assistant manager by 1982, producing all concerts, recitals and special presentations, including the annual free Opera in the Park concert. Her very special projects

-921-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 1055

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.