The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIFTEEN
PART D

The Recording Industry –Pinnacles of the Platters

Alison Ames

Susan Napodano DelGiorno

Marnie Hall

Barbara Harbach

Amelia Haygood

Lynne Hoffman-Engel

Elaine Martone

Karen Moody

Melanie Mueller

Jane Welton

Robina Young

Nancy Zannini

Deutsche Grammophon

Koch International

Leonarda

Hester Park Records

Delos

Telarc

Telarc

PolyGram

Avie

Protone

harmonia mundi

PolyGram

Former Vice President Artists/Repertoire

General Manager

Founder and President

Owner

Founder and president

Vice President of Sales

Vice President

Former Vice President Development

President - Music Company (London) Ltd.

President (1971–2000)

Vice President, Producer/Artistic Director

Former Vice President of Soundtracks

Several women have made it to the top in international recording companies, others run their own companies, while still others have artists subsidize their own recordings. Some names have been included even though they are no longer in their positions, to illustrate the variety and scope of this field.

ALISON AMESFrom Disc Spinner to Luthier to PR… in September 1995, Alison Ames became a vice president at Angel/EMI Records, after having been with Deutche Grammophon since 1973, and serving as vice president of Artists and Repertoire for DG.

She began life January 4, 1945, in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, and was exposed to New York Philharmonic broadcasts on Sundays, piano and flute lessons, and being taken to concerts—all the "normal" childhood pastimes which are rarely part of children's lives in our electronic age. With a BA in English from Hollins College (Roanoke, Virginia, 1966), Alison went into the world, and by 1973 was a secretary at the New York office of DG, working her way up to publicist. In 1977 she went to Germany, doing English translations for DG markets in Western Europe, North America and Japan. When DG and the Dutch recording company Philips joined with London Decca in 1980, under the Polygram Classics label, Ames returned to New York and, as vice president, ran DG until 1989. (History was made that decade with three women in major positions at the major labels: Nancy Zannini, Philips, Lynn Hoffman Engel, London/Decca, and Liz Ostrow, head of Artists and Recordings at New World Records.)

Helping to implement significant changes with artists, repertoire, and the way records were being made, Ames, as executive producer, dealt with such notables as Leonard Bernstein, the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, Emerson String Quartet, André Previn and Gil Shaham, plus taking care of the logistics of orchestras recording under maestros like Pierre Boulez and James Levine. Metropolitan Opera recordings are conducted in the Manhattan Center, the last large scale studio extant in New York. Other recording sessions are held in the depths of the American Academy of Arts and Letters building on 155th Street, where it was not beneath a producer's dignity to fetch

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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