The World of Women in Classical Music

By Anne K. Gray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

The Unforgotten

This final section of the book truly illustrates the power of women—especially when combined with wealth! Beginning with royal patronesses from the time of the renaissance, women have always been behind the scenes supporting artists, orchestras, opera companies, chamber groups, etc. The wealthy have donated money—even part of their estates—to the cause of the arts. The foundation of many orchestras, conservatories and other vital threads have been woven into the grand tapestry of music by these philanthropists—for which we are forever grateful.

In modern times, along with their less affluent sisters, they have given thousands of volunteer hours in ladies' auxiliaries, arranging luncheons, receptions, stuffing envelopes and organizing fund raisers. Professionally, women have transcended to the administrative arena with astounding accomplishments. Each entry here is a revelation of what can be achieved with a determined woman at the helm. Most of the following have left us, but should never be forgotten.

Leonore Annenberg

Judith Arron

Helen Black

Eleanor Caldwell

Artie Mason Carter

Dorothy Chandler

Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge

Helen Copley

Marie Louise Curtis

Louise Davies

Carol Fox

Sybil Harrington

Carol Colburn Høgel

Ima Hogg

Adella Prentiss Hughes

Christine Fisher Hunter

Florence Irish

Joan and Irwin Jacobs

Louise Lincoln Kerr

Ardis Krainik

Belle Mehus

Marjorie Merriweather Post

Elisabeth Severance

Philadelphia Orchestra & others

Carnegie Hall

Denver Symphony

Wheeling Symphony

Hollywood Bowl

Los Angeles Music Center

Wolf Trap

San Diego Symphony Hall

Curtis Institute of Music

Davies Symphony Hall

Chicago Lyric Opera

Metropolitan Opera, etc.

Richard D. Colburn Foundation

Houston Symphony

Cleveland Orchestra

MET/Gramma Fisher Foundation

Hollywood Bowl

San Diego Symphony

Phoenix Symphony, et. al.

Chicago Lyric Opera

Bismarck, North Dakota

National Symphony

Severance Hall, Cleveland

Philanthropy Extraordinaire

Executive & Artistic Director (1986–98)

Manager

Benefactress

Founder/Executive Director

Founder/Newspaperwoman/Philanthropist

Philanthropist

Philanthropist

Founder

Philanthropist

Founder/Director (1952–81)

Largest Donor

Other Philanthropies

Founder/Philanthropist

Manager(1918–32+)

Pro Bono Chair

Philanthropist/Executive Director

Endowment Donor/Fund Manager

Philanthropist/Founder

General Director (1981–97)

Music Lady of the Prairie

Philanthropist

In Memoriam

-976-

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The World of Women in Classical Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Dedication iii
  • Other Books by Anne K. Gray iv
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 19
  • Chapter Three 28
  • Chapter Four - Part A 47
  • Chapter Four: Part B 73
  • Chapter Five: Part A 99
  • Chapter Five: Part B 119
  • Chapter Five: Part C 150
  • Chapter Five: Part D 159
  • Chapter Five: Part E 169
  • Chapter Six 179
  • Chapter Seven 185
  • Chapter Eight 205
  • Chapter Nine - Part A 217
  • Chapter Nine - Part B 236
  • Chapter Ten 292
  • Chapter Eleven - Part A 301
  • Chapter Eleven - Part B 315
  • Chapter Eleven - Part C 364
  • Chapter Eleven - Part D 377
  • Chapter Eleven - Part E 386
  • Chapter Eleven - Part F 415
  • Chapter Twelve - Part A 422
  • Chapter Twelve - Part B 474
  • Chapter Twelve - Part C 482
  • Chapter Twelve - Part D 512
  • Chapter Twelve - Part E 528
  • Chapter Twelve - Part F 532
  • Chapter Twelve - Part G 566
  • Chapter Twelve - Part H 583
  • Chapter Twelve - Part I 604
  • Chapter Twelve - Part J 608
  • Chapter Twelve - Part K 614
  • Chapter Twelve - Part L 672
  • Chapter Twelve - Part M 695
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part A 699
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part B 715
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part C 736
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part D 750
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part E 791
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part F 805
  • Chapter Thirteen - Part G 819
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part A 830
  • Chapter Fourteen - Part B 870
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part A 898
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part B 921
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part C 937
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part D 943
  • Chapter Fifteen - Part E 949
  • Chapter Sixteen 957
  • Chapter Seventeen 976
  • Afterword 999
  • Appendix 1002
  • Abbrevations 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Selected Discography 1015
  • Photo Credits 1020
  • Author's Biography 1031
  • Index 1033
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