Dictionary of Jewish Words/

By Joyce Eisenberg; Ellen Scolnic | Go to book overview

F

falafel n. Hebrew (fuh-LAH-full) A mixture of mashed chickpeas, spices, and flour that is shaped into patties and deep fried. It is usually served in pita bread with lettuce, cucumber, tomato, and tahini, a creamy sesame seed sauce. Falafel sandwiches are street food in Israel, and falafel stands are a common sight, much like sidewalk hot dog carts are in cities in the United States.

Falasha n. Amharic (fuh-LAH-shah) Literally, “stranger” or “immigrant” in the language of Ethiopia. An Ethiopian who practices a form of Judaism, using the Old Testament and some apocryphal books. Some of their traditions correspond to Jewish traditions.The word “Falasha” is considered derogatory; Falashas call themselves Beit Israel (House of Israel) and believe themselves to be descended from the tribe of Dan. They faced discrimination in Ethiopia, and in 1984 and 1991 thousands of these “Black Jews” were airlifted to the State of Israel in daring rescue missions. Some remaining Ethiopians, who want to immigrate to Israel, are facing discrimination and obstacles because of Israel's debate over the Law of Return.

fapitzed adj. Yiddish (fah-PITZED) All dolled up; overdressed for the occasion. Used to describe someone wearing too much jewelry or too many bows, or having too big a hairdo. “She came to brunch at our house wearing a new suit, high heels, and a diamond necklace. She was all fapitzed.”

farbissen adj. Yiddish (far-BISS-en) Bitter, obstinate, scrooge-like. n. masc. farbissener (far-BISS-en-er); fern, farbisseneh (farBlSS-en-eh) A mean, unpleasant person; a sourpuss.

farblondjet adj. Yiddish (far-BLON-jit) Lost; having no idea where one is. “Between reading the directions and looking for the sign, I got so farblondjet that I turned off the turnpike at the wrong exit.” Old-fashioned usage.

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Dictionary of Jewish Words/
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • A 1
  • B 12
  • C 23
  • D 31
  • E 35
  • F 40
  • G 44
  • H 51
  • I 65
  • J 67
  • K 72
  • L 86
  • M 91
  • N 109
  • O 114
  • P 117
  • R 125
  • S 132
  • T 158
  • U 170
  • V 172
  • W 173
  • Y 175
  • Z 182
  • Bibliography 185
  • Category Lists 188
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