Ethics in Business: Faith at Work

By James M. Childs Jr. | Go to book overview

1

BRIDGING THE
SHAREABILITY GAP

Faith shapes ethical business practice. Actions and decisions need to be responsible to all the stakeholders. For example, in banking, you don't sell someone a product they don't need or shouldn't buy just because you can sell it and it will increase your numbers. At the same time, if you discontinue an unprofitable product, you have to think about how to take care of those left in the lurch who need a product like the one you're dropping. Prioritize relationships over numbers and the numbers will come.]

Stan thought for a moment and then went on. [Another way I see my Christian ethics expressed in my business practice is when I try in my community relations responsibilities to help make banking services responsive to community needs. When the local community came to the bank protesting that they needed more loans and other services in their area, I listened. I didn't try to fight them or ignore them. Together we worked out a strategy that was realistic; the bank helped them as much as possible, and they recognized and respected the financial realities the bank had to work with. I think my efforts to build relationships with the community were a contribution I made as a Christian. It stands in contrast to the kind of bad mentality that always sees the other party in a dispute as the enemy who hes.s to be undermined or discredited.]

[It sounds to me like your faith as a Christian plays a big role in your daily work life,] I said. [Has the church been a help to you in that regard? A great many businesspeople feel that the church has not paid much attention to the faith-life connection.]

[It is probably true that the church doesn't fully appreciate the needs of people in the business world, but,] he added with great emphasis, [the church has endorsed my vocation in life; what I do has meaning.] Stan went on to say with equal emphasis that the church needs to continue to support and encourage people in a sense of [vocation] that gives meaning and direction to their life and work.

-1-

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Ethics in Business: Faith at Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: Bridging the Shareability Gap 1
  • 2: From Being a Nobody to Being a Somebody 14
  • 3: The Not-So-Secular World 28
  • 4: From Dualism to Dialogue 42
  • 5: Beyond the Moral Minimum 56
  • 6: Beyond Leadership to Servant Leadership 71
  • 7: Beyond Affirmative Action 86
  • 8: Beyond Mere Survival 102
  • 9: Beyond Certainty 121
  • 10: Beyond the Company Walls 136
  • Notes 149
  • Index 163
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