Ethics in Business: Faith at Work

By James M. Childs Jr. | Go to book overview

8

BEYOND MERE SURVIVAL

Calling for global responsibility is first and foremost the opposite of calling
for what is a mere ethic of success: It is the opposite of an action for which
the end sanctifies the means and for which whatever functions, brings
profit, power or enjoyment, is good…. So in concrete terms, the slogan
for the Third Millennium should run: World society is responsible for its
own future! This is responsibility for our society and environment and
also for the world after us.1

So stated noted theologian Hans Küng. In Küng's views the world will have a future only if we develop a universal ethic of responsibility for the world and for each other, responsibility that includes care for the environment, an outlook on nature that is more than simplistically utilitarian.

It is hard to imagine an arena of ethical concern more suited to the sort of dialogue we have been trumpeting than the environment. By its very nature, the present crisis of the environment is on everyone's agenda. Therefore, it should not be surprising to see it as a central issue of Küng's concern for the responsible global society of the future. However, everyone's agenda does not necessarily classify environmental issues as ethical. Everyone has heard the alarm that, if we do not change our ways, the effects of pollution, global warming, depletion of the ozone layer, and overpopulation will threaten our survival as a race and the viability of the biosphere itself. In response to this threat, we have promoted legislation, technology, research, and new ways of thinking about how industry can expand in environmentally responsible ways. These initiatives are essential components for an effective environmentalism, but they do not, by themselves, constitute an ethic for the environment. Rather, government regulation, scientific and technological projects, and plans for responsible industrial expansion are parts of a strategy for survival.

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethics in Business: Faith at Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: Bridging the Shareability Gap 1
  • 2: From Being a Nobody to Being a Somebody 14
  • 3: The Not-So-Secular World 28
  • 4: From Dualism to Dialogue 42
  • 5: Beyond the Moral Minimum 56
  • 6: Beyond Leadership to Servant Leadership 71
  • 7: Beyond Affirmative Action 86
  • 8: Beyond Mere Survival 102
  • 9: Beyond Certainty 121
  • 10: Beyond the Company Walls 136
  • Notes 149
  • Index 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 165

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.